Jon Krakauer

Jon Krakauer Mansplains Rape, But Will His Book Help Women?

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Jon Krakauer’s Missoula is the true-crime story of a handful of acquaintance rapes in one college town. Krakauer, who happens to be my favorite narrative nonfiction writer, uses the same technique he applied in his last two books about fundamentalist Mormons and a covered-up death in Afghanistan, respectively, to examine the way a single American community handled a number of university rape cases.
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A Nonfiction Tour of America: 50 Books for 50 States

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Whether you’re staying at home this summer or traveling around to different parts of America, the easiest way to discover what makes this country tick, in ways both maddening and beautiful, is to read some books. To aid you on this virtual journey, Flavorwire has dug up some of the best nonfiction about specific American locations — in this case, our 50 states — and found 50 books that will shed light on every corner of the …Read More

‘The Summit’: Why Do People Climb Dangerous Mountains?

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The Summit, a documentary about a 2008 mountain climbing expedition that left people dead, is a perfectly good iteration of its genre. There’s tons of awe-inspiring footage from the top of K2, the second highest peak in the world (after Everest, of course). There’s a lot of people remembering a very bad day in their lives with the appropriate balance of solemnity and excitement. There’s some conflicting evidence, and some recreation, and some present footage. It’s a perfectly good way to spend an evening. But at the end of the film you’re still left with the question that dogs all stories of this kind: why the hell are these people climbing these mountains?
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