Julia Stiles

’10 Things I Hate About You’ Celebrates Its 15th Anniversary: Where’s Our Next Self-Identified Teen Feminist Heroine?

On March 31, 1999, 10 Things I Hate About You premiered in theaters, updating Taming of the Shrew for the turn-of-the-millennium set. Baz Luhrmann had adapted Romeo + Juliet a few years earlier, but this was a more complete modernization, frothed up with snappy dialogue, high-school dramatics, and then-unknown Heath Ledger’s roguish grin. It made perfect sense that this Shakespearean adaptation would come served as a teen movie, because teen movies were in their prime. Classic late-’90s films like She’s All That, Cruel Intentions, and Varsity Blues directly preceded 10 Things, heralding a new post-John Hughes renaissance of the teen movie. … Read More

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Your Weekly TV News Roundup: ‘Gotham’ Casts Bruce Wayne, E! Goes Royal

The television world moves so fast that by the time you learn of a show’s premiere, it could already be canceled. It’s hard to keep track of the constant stream of television news, so Flavorwire is here to provide a weekly roundup of the most exciting — and baffling — casting and development updates. This week, Bob’s Burgers gets an album deal, MasterChef Junior gets two more seasons, and VH1 gets the awful lineup that it deserves. … Read More

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Flavorwire’s Guide to Movies You Need to Stream This Week

Welcome to Flavorwire’s streaming movie guide, in which we help you sift through the scores of movies streaming on Netflix, Hulu, Amazon, and other services to find the best of the recently available, freshly relevant, or soon to expire. This week, we’ve got great stuff from Richard Gere, Forest Whitaker, David Cross, Susan Sarandon, Casey Affleck, Tim Roth, Julia Stiles, Brit Marling, Dave Grohl, Chloe Grace Moretz, Blake Lively, Jessica Alba, Kate Hudson, and more. Check them out after the jump, and follow the title links to watch them right now. … Read More

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Flavorwire’s Guide to Movies You Need to Stream This Week

Welcome to Flavorwire’s streaming movie guide, in which we help you sift through the scores of movies streaming on Netflix, Hulu, Amazon, and other services to find the best of the recently available, freshly relevant, or soon to expire. This week, Netflix did a big drop of catalog titles, some of them (like the ever-fluctuating 007 movies) returning after the notorious “Streamageddon.” So we’ve got great stuff from Robert Downey Jr., Jake Gyllenhaal, Elizabeth Banks, Seth Rogen, Kevin Spacey, Julia Stiles, Taye Diggs, Samuel L. Jackson, Mark Ruffalo, Harvey Kietel, David Fincher, John Hughes, Spike Lee, Errol Morris, Kevin Smith, and more. Check them out after the jump, and follow the title links to watch them right now. … Read More

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10 Great 2013 Movies You Can Watch at Home Right Now

Those of us who get hives at the very idea of being out in crowds and start sweating merely from exerting the force of locking our doors behind us may have a hard time getting too worked up at the prospect of heading out to the multiplex over this holiday weekend — the theaters are bustling, the temperatures are high, and the biggest new attraction is two and a half hours of The Lone Ranger. But fear not, fellow agoraphobes: thanks to the wonders of modern technology, some of the year’s best movies are available at the click of a button. Yes, due to collapsing theatrical-to-home-video windows and the increasing presence of simultaneous theatrical and VOD releases, several of Flavorwire’s best of 2013 thus far are available at this very moment, and for a fraction of that parking/ticket/popcorn price. … Read More

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Liked Whedon’s ‘Much Ado’? Watch Almereyda’s ‘Hamlet’

Welcome to “Like That? Watch This,” a regular feature in which Flavorwire suggests an older film that might be enjoyed by fans of a popular new release. This weekend, everyone was sharing the love for Joss Whedon’s modernized adaptation of Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing; if you liked that film’s clever updating of the Bard’s classic (or if it hasn’t made its way to your town just yet), you might like Michael Almereyda’s 2000 adaptation of Hamlet.

The late ‘90s and early 2000s saw a mini-boom of Shakespeare updates at the multiplex — some merely swiping story elements and loose narratives, others transposing the Bard’s language into a modern setting. The impetus for the boomlet was the unexpected box office success of Baz Luhrmann’s 1996 Romeo + Juliet, which made over Shakespeare’s tragedy into tale of warring businesses and trigger-happy beach bums. … Read More

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‘It’s a Disaster': David Cross and Julia Styles’ End-of-the-World Movie Takes Dark Comedy to a Hilarious Extreme

Todd Berger’s It’s a Disaster opens deceptively, with a black and white image of a beach — but as the credits roll, a slow pull out reveals the explosion of an A-bomb off in the distance. The film’s narrative uncoils in a similar fashion: Tracy (Julia Stiles) is bringing Glenn (David Cross), a possible new boyfriend, to what another character dubs “our famous ‘couples brunches.’” There, Glenn will meet four other couples, Tracy’s long-time friends; pleasantries will be exchanged and topics will be gingerly avoided, and the stage is set, it seems, for some good old-fashioned comedy of awkwardness. That’s before all the dirty bombs go off. … Read More

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Flavorwire’s Guide to Indie Flicks to See in April

Spring is upon us, dear readers, so it’s your last chance to enjoy some light entertainment before the summer onslaught of giant explosions and endless sequels. (What’s that? G.I. Joe 2 came out last weekend? Let’s pretend like it didn’t happen.) As is our wont on the first of the month, we’ve rounded up April’s independent films of note: those we’ve seen and recommended, and those we can’t wait to get a look at. Join us after the jump for a sampling of this month’s art house goodies. … Read More

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10 Ingenious Shakespeare Adaptations on Film

The best of this week’s (admittedly lean) DVD releases is Coriolanus, the sleek and muscular Shakespeare adaptation from star and first-time director Ralph Fiennes. He’s been angling to bring the play to the screen for nearly a dozen years now, since he first played it on the London stage, and when the time came to do so, he did what many a filmmaker before him has done to make Shakespeare tenable to today’s audience: he modernized it. But the text is so open, and his staging is so robust, that the interpretation works; it couldn’t feel more timely and appropriate, with (perhaps intentional, perhaps accidental) allusions to the Tea Party, Congressional dysfunction, and the Occupy movement that land without the clumsiness that so often batters political cinema.

In honor of a job well done, we’ve assembled ten other films that altered the Bard’s plots and texts in a similarly entertaining fashion. Check them out after the jump, and add your own in the comments. … Read More

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The Worst January Film Releases of All Time

January is upon us, and we film fans know what that means: nothing good. The first month of the year is traditionally the dumping ground for Hollywood studios, the month in which they unload the films that aren’t quality enough for the Oscar-courting fall, but not commercial enough for the lucrative holiday, spring, and summer seasons. January is where bad movies go to die, and where studios hope we won’t notice them. They’re usually right; viewers either tend to catch up on the prestige pictures that are going into wider release, or just stay at home and watch football. But our nation’s film critics, fat and happy after the holiday feast of smart, highbrow entertainment, are often subjected to the sugar crash of January dogs, and as a result, their reviews often pack a little bit of extra vitriol. After the jump, we’ve assembled the ten worst movies released in the month of January — according to the reliable aggregators at Rotten Tomatoes — along with a few choice words from the scribes who sat through them. … Read More

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