Katie Roiphe

Why Does Women’s Confessional Writing Get People So Riled Up?

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It feels so weird to write this sentence, but Katie Roiphe is completely, totally right: if Karl Ove Knausgaard were a woman writing as meanderingly and passionately about the minutiae of life, the reviews of My Struggle would be much different. Certainly, as Roiphe observes at Slate, “what in a male writer appears as courage or innovation or literary heroics would be read, in a woman, even by the liberal, enlightened, and literary, as hubris or worse.”
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What Was the Worst Thing on the Internet This Week?

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The Internet is a wasteland — or, if you’re feeling more glass-half-full, a haven — for trolling, pandering, and self-aggrandizing, whether it be in innovative or particularly reductive ways. Every day there are at least one or two obnoxious things that are deserving of our hate-click, and our temporary outrage only brings the unnecessary attention to such ridiculata. Yet we can’t help ourselves from promoting it, now can we? Join us in our rage, for each week we nominate the worst Internet-based events of the previous five days, and determine which of the nominees is, in fact, The Worst.
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In Praise of Messy Katie Roiphe

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As a writer who sometimes is accused of propagating unpopular opinions and indulging in contrarianism for the sake of attention and pageviews, it might not be surprising to hear that I quite adore Katie Roiphe, the cultural critic and essayist who regularly publishes screeds full of ideas that go against what any normal person would see as rational thought. Of course, she’s been doing this since she published her first book, The Morning After: Sex, Fear and Feminism on Campus, in 1993: there, she alleged, among other criticisms of modern, mainstream feminism, that much of the so-called date rape epidemic was rooted in poor decisions made by its female victims. 
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Learn from the Best: 10 Course Syllabi by Famous Authors

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Every once in a while, one of eminent professor and author David Foster Wallace’s syllabi emerges on the Internet, and countless devotees head to their local bookstores. In case you’ve already read through DFW’s favorites (or want another look), we’ve taken this opportunity to pull together a series of famous authors’ syllabi and reading lists for your convenience. Hey, who needs to go to college when you’ve got a list of texts from the best and a public library (you should still go to college)? After the jump, read through ten syllabi from famous writers — who knows, you might just learn something.
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