Kelly Link

Flavorwire Staffers’ Favorite Books of 2015

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We’ve already published our editors’ official best-of lists for fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, but that doesn’t mean there weren’t personal favorites among all of us here at Flavorwire. And the selections here cover a lot of ground: there are deep dives into the film and music industry; “autotheory” memoirs; two books set in Virginia; and, of course, Ferrante.
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The Best Fiction of 2015

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Forget the tedium of straightforward realism, 2015 was a year when theme pushed form in daring new directions. So instead of celebrating the Big TV Novels of the American white male, we’re happy to applaud this motley group of genius fictions, books that never failed to challenge the pieties of life in the 21st century.
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Are Amy Schumer and Jessica Chastain the Next Big Comedy Duo? Links You Need to See

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Ah, Amy Schumer: one of the rare celebrities, who, the more ubiquitous she becomes and the further she gets into her “uncontested reign as the queen of comedy,” the more people love her. Such was the Schumer-description in The Dissolve’s announcement of today’s new Schumer-thing (one does, gladly, seem to come out at least once a week these days). Today’s particular Schumer-thing was especially intriguing, albeit not certain: the comedian may be co-starring with Jessica Chastain as her “wild and crude acquaintance Summer” in the “girls-gone-wild” comedy Plus One. Meanwhile, through the example of Amy Schumer’s latest brilliant sketch (about Bill Cosby), The Atlantic traces how comedians (also included: Louis C.K., Key and Peele, Sarah Silverman, John Oliver) went from being fulfillers of escapism to legitimate public intellectuals, consistently leading audiences to confront the uglier aspects of society.
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50 Great Genre-Bending Books Everyone Should Read

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Sometimes, it seems as though the arguments about genre — be it poetry vs. fiction, fiction vs. nonfiction, literary fiction vs. SF vs. fantasy vs. mystery vs. vs. vs. — will never end. So why not just take yourself off the board entirely? After all, marketing professionals aside, does anyone really care what genre they’re reading if the book is good? After the jump, 50 genre-bending novels guaranteed to enthrall you, whether you’re a literary fiction snob or a die-hard fantasy nerd. Enjoy without judgements!
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10 Must-Read Books For February

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Winter may be closing in, the nights may be frosty and cold, but we have book after book after book to keep you warm. It’s like the publishing industry just woke up from its winter hibernation, ready to regale us with stories. From a brilliant book about motherhood to the memoir of the coolest woman alive, there’s definitely a February book that will beguile and tempt you in equal measures.
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Girl Canon: 50 Essential Books About the Female Experience

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Everyone knows that, statistically at least, girls read more than boys. But the classic, canonical growing-up books, at least in American culture, tend to represent the male experience — I’m thinking On the Road, The Catcher in the Rye, everything ever written by Bret Easton Ellis or Michael Chabon — and while these are great books, suitable for boys or girls, the question remains: where are the books for girls to grow up on? Well, they’re definitely out there, if perhaps assigned less often in schools to readers of both genders. And so I propose a Girl Canon, populated by books not necessarily for girls but which investigate, address, or represent the female experience in some essential …Read More

50 Books to Cure Heartbreak

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Heartbroken? Left alone? Depressed? And right before the holidays? Never fear, because this is no end-of-year list — it’s a list to cure that broken heart of yours. Now, there are as many ways to mend a broken heart as there are to break one, but hopefully this list will contain something for everyone, whether you prefer to muffle pain with laughter, or might take some hope in a happy ending, or just need to wallow. After all, as James Baldwin said, “You think your pain and your heartbreak are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you read. It was books that taught me that the things that tormented me most were the very things that connected me with all the people who were alive, or who had ever been alive.” So here you go, gang: 50 cures for love, all $25 or less.
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25 Genre Novels That Should be Classics

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There’s been a lot of talk about genre in the air recently (well, really, when isn’t there?) — what it means, whether it’s changed, whether it’s even useful or important anymore. But no matter what is said, there’s still that lingering stigma that keeps worthy works of genre (for clarity, we’re mostly talking fantasy and science fiction, with a little historical fiction, mystery and crime thrown in for good measure) from ascending to full classic status: being taught in high schools, appearing on all-time best-book lists, etc. Some genre novels have already crossed the border into pure classic territory — Brave New World, Slaughterhouse-Five and 1984 are all genre and established classics by any measuring stick, The Lord of the Rings is so ubiquitous and grand that it’s forced itself into the canon, and let’s not forget that Wuthering Heights is a ghost story, and so, of course, is Beloved. To add to that list, here are 25 genre novels that should be considered classics. Add even more, if that’s your desire, in the comments.
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