Leonardo Dicaprio

The 10 Best Movie Moments of 2015

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As the year-end lists and nominations and awards pile up, it’s time for a Flavorwire tradition that goes all the way back to 2010: our round-up of the the individual scenes and sequences from this year’s movies that have stuck in our heads. Sometimes the films around them don’t measure up to these moments of greatness; sometimes they do, with those interludes standing out as the best of the best. Either way, these are the movie moments worth treasuring from 2015. …Read More

Watch Leo DiCaprio Seek Revenge on Tom Hardy in Trailer for Iñárritu’s ‘The Revenant’

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You can tell immediately, in watching the trailer for Alejandro González Iñárritu’s The Revenant, that, like Birdman and Gravity, it was shot by master cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki, as the camera orbits and sweeps around characters’ brutal acts as though they were planets (…or Birdmen). It’s one of the things that makes the predominantly non-verbal first trailer for the film so captivating — well, that and Leonardo DiCaprio’s wild grimaces as he makes his way through the wilderness as a betrayed hunter seeking revenge. 
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Jesse Eisenberg Vehemently Disliked Comic-Con: Links You Need to See

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Are the stars rebelling against the geeks? At Comic-Con, Bryan Cranston came out with a funny — if slightly cruel — response to a typically inane fan question, then the cast of Game of Thrones openly admitted to not reading the books. But Jesse Eisenberg has topped them all. “I don’t know what the experience is throughout history, probably some kind of genocide,” he said, speaking about Comic-Con, which he attended in support of Batman v Superman. “I can’t think of anything that’s equivalent…Even if they’re saying nice things, just being shouted at by thousands of people, it’s horrifying.”
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‘Cymbeline,’ Baz Luhrmann’s ‘Romeo + Juliet,’ and Why Shakespeare Is So Hard to Adapt for the Screen

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When a director does Shakespeare today, it seems there are three options most commonly selected, each of which has its drawbacks. The first is to do a loyal interpretation, maintaining the original setting and time specified by the Bard (for if you’re the type that chooses loyalty, you also may use this insufferable term), but risking the adaptation seeming like an ostentatiously astute encapsulation of a period and lifestyle that’s now irrelevant. The second is to set it in the present day,  underscoring the barbarism, archaism, and/or hilarity of a current societal norm by aligning it with Elizabethan text, but also risking bifurcating the text and its original meaning. The third is to set it somewhere and sometime else completely, avoiding the distraction of current day trappings (Lady Macbeth discovers Seinfeld emojis!), not to mention the equally distracting trappings of Elizabethan imitation (vocal fry is especially noticeable when it’s coming from a ruff-encased throat).
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