Lifetime

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Laurence Fishburne Is Starring as Author Alex Haley in A+E’s ‘Roots’ Remake

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Deadline reports that Laurence Fishburne will be playing the role of author Alex Haley in A&E’s upcoming remake of Roots. The original eight-episode miniseries adaption, which debuted in 1977, is based off Haley’s novel, Roots: The Saga of An American Family — a narrative of American slavery and the life of the character Kunta Kinte, who’s captured in the Gambia and sold into slavery once on American soil.
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Sharp, Original ‘UnREAL’ Savages Reality TV Stereotypes in Lifetime’s Best Show in Years

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When it comes to quality scripted dramas — or quality anything, really — Lifetime is never the first network that comes to mind, if it ever comes up at all. Lifetime practically revels in its poor reputation, boasting its laughably bad biopics and questionable movies about “empowered” (but mentally/physically tortured) women. And that’s what makes the arrival of UnREAL such a rare treat. The drama, which premieres tonight, is not only addictive and entertaining; it’s also shockingly smart — and easily the best program the network has put out in years.
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Lifeless, Unnecessary ‘Grace of Monaco’ Finds Its Level at Lifetime

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Grace of Monaco isn’t a Lifetime Original Movie — it’s quieter and less sensational than the network’s biopics, and doesn’t take too much interest in destroying its subject, Grace Kelly — but it’s certainly a good fit on the network. Prior to its Cannes premiere (and subsequent panning by critics)Grace of Monaco was met with criticism for being an inaccurate portrayal and a “farce,” just like basically every other Lifetime biopic. It also has all the general staples of a Lifetime flick: embarrassing acting, shoddy writing, a general disconnect between scenes, and most of all, utterly boring.
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From Cannes to Lifetime: A ‘Grace of Monaco’ Disaster Timeline

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Dozing off on the couch Memorial Day evening with a belly full of improperly cooked-out burgers and cheap beer is a bit of a holiday tradition (in our house, anyway), but this year, there’s a particularly fascinating bit of television programming for you to nod off to: Grace of Monaco, in which Oscar winner Nicole Kidman plays iconic movie-star-turned-princess Grace Kelly. This was supposed to be a giant movie: opening the Cannes Film Festival, awards season push by the Weinstein Company, Oscar glory. Instead, it’s quietly making its stateside debut on Lifetime, a network better known for cringe-worthy original biopics and tales of women in jeopardy. So how did such a prestige project end up on a punchline network? Let’s roll the tape.
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Lifetime’s Disturbing Obsession With Kidnapped Women

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This month, Lifetime is airing three different movies about women who get kidnapped. Last week was Cleveland Abduction, tomorrow night is the premiere of Stockholm, Pennsylvania, and later this month (May 23) the network will air Kidnapped: The Hannah Anderson Story. The movies vary in quality — though none are especially memorable, as is Lifetime’s way — but each remarks on Lifetime’s ongoing and increasingly unsettling obsession with kidnapped women. 
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Lifetime’s ‘The Lizzie Borden Chronicles’ Makes the Case for Women Serial Killers on Television

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As weird as it may have sounded when originally announced, a television series centered around Lizzie Borden is actually a sound idea. Borden, the woman tried and acquitted for brutally murdering her parents with an axe, remains a notorious figure today (the first timeI heard of her was, like many others, through the popular schoolyard rhyme). It’s also a good time for serial killers on television: Dexter ended a while ago but it’s been replaced with HannibalBates Motel, The Following, and others. These shows all focus on male serial killers; Lifetime premiering a cat-and-mouse detective series about a female serial killer is, surprisingly for the network, a near-genius idea. 
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Lifetime’s Brontë Update ‘Wuthering High School’ Is No ‘Clueless’

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There are certain works of literature that make the most sense when you understand their characters as adolescents, even if they were written before teenagers were considered a discrete demographic. Jane Austen’s Emma, for instance, clicks into place when you understand Emma as a teenager figuring out her world and growing up, which is why Clueless is such a perfect adaptation. Romeo and Juliet, and the Baz Luhrmann and Franco Zeffirelli adaptations which emphasize the characters’ youth, passion and immaturity, bring forth these elements in Shakespeare’s work.
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