Margaret Cho

Margaret Cho Has a Lot to Say ‘About Sex’: Links You Need to See

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The Björk chain reaction is wildly at play: a couple of days ago, Björk’s new album, Vulnicura, was leaked, and said leakage led to the album’s rushed official release, which has incidentally now led to the publishing of this incredible interview with the artist by Pitchfork (titled “The Invisible Woman: A Conversation with Björk” instead what should have been an obvious titular frontrunner, “Pitchbjörk”). In it, Björk gushes about her fandom for Joni Mitchell and her collaboration with co-producer Arca, while noting how many times her music’s been misrepresented — despite her 30 years of making music — as having been the work of her male collaborators; she cites journalistic perceptions of Kanye as the example of this imbalance:
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Exclusive Supercut: Just the Amy and Tina Parts From the 2015 Golden Globes

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Your Golden Globe awards aired last night, and there was plenty to talk about, but who’re we kidding: as per usual, the main attraction was Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, doing a yeoman’s job in their third (and reportedly last) go-round as Globe hosts. But if you clicked away for THAT EPISODE of Girls, or didn’t feel like sitting through three hours of self-congratulation for their 15 minutes of comedy, we’ve got you covered: here is our exclusive supercut of the Tina and Amy stuff, aka just about all you really need to see.
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What Is “Gay Voice”? New Documentary ‘Do I Sound Gay?’ Provides Plenty of Empowerment But Few Answers

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Do I Sound Gay?, which opened the DOC NYC film festival Tuesday night and has since been picked up by Sundance Selects, is not a successful documentary in the traditional sense. Apart from superficial factors, like the insufferable repetition of its title, clunky humor, seemingly contrived footage, and some heavy-handed camera work, it forsakes the documentarian quest for answers — or even, simply, for depth — in favor of a neat, PSA-ish three-act narrative of empowerment. And yet, the ideas that surface in David Thorpe’s flawed documentary happen to be endlessly fascinating, and its message, which overwhelms the film, happens to be incredibly valuable.
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