Martin Scorsese

10 Great Movies That Appear In 10 Other Great Movies

There are all sorts of reasons to see Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Ali: Fear Eats The Soul (debuting this week on Blu-ray, via The Criterion Collection), but here’s the one that finally clinched it for me: when they go see it in Middle of Nowhere. By inserting the earlier film into a later one, Nowhere’s director, Ava DuVernay, isn’t just telling us something about the kind of people who inhabit her story; she’s also savvily commenting on the kind of story she’s telling. And she’s not the only filmmaker to employ this very clever trick. … Read More

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Martin Scorsese’s ‘The 50 Year Argument’ Is a Love Letter to Intellectuals

There is a lot of reading in The 50 Year Argument, a documentary about the venerable institution The New York Review of Books and its 50-year history of being engaged with the world. Notably, the documentary is the work of Martin Scorsese and his co-director David Tedeschi, and the two longtime filmmakers’ imprint on this doc is crucial: you can imagine it being tedious talking-head boredom in lesser hands (it is, at points, even in Scorsese’s hands — more like the 50 year nap, am I right?), but the directors skillfully pull off the trick that, by telling the story of a publication, they’re telling a story of the culture shifts of the last 50 years, in words and in actions. … Read More

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10 Evocative Southern Gothic Films

Southern Gothic cinema owes a lot to the great Tennessee Williams, whose stunning stage plays became evocative films. Works like A Streetcar Named Desire and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof introduced moviegoers to the steamy South, revealing its sinister side. Trading the grand for the grotesque, Southern Gothic cinema was born from the literary genre made famous by authors like Flannery O’Connor and Harper Lee. These films brought the genre’s penchant for sex, secrets, and betrayal to the big screen. Williams is currently the subject of a Film Forum retrospective. Inspired by his Southern Gothic style, here are ten films that capture the dark heart of the South. … Read More

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Every Martin Scorsese Movie, Ranked

Monday night, following screenings at the Toronto and New York Film Festivals, HBO will premiere The 50 Year Argument, the terrific new documentary celebrating 50 years of The New York Review of Books. It is also the latest effort from legendary — and legendarily prolific — filmmaker Martin Scorsese (co-directing with David Tedeschi, who has edited several of Scorsese’s previous documentaries). So how does it compare to the rest of the Scorsese filmography? To answer that question, Flavorwire presents the DEFINITIVE* ranking of Martin Scorsese’s narrative and documentary features (stretching feature a bit to include long-ish documentaries and made-for-TV works), stacking up 36 films over nearly 50 years. … Read More

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Fascinating, Unseen Publicity and Behind-the-Scenes Photos From Classic Movies

Leave it to Karina Longworth — host of the indispensable movie-buff podcast “You Must Remember This” and author of two of the best books in Cahiers du Cinema’s “Anatomy of an Actor” series — to cook up a whole new angle for looking at old movies. Her new book Hollywood Frame by Frame: The Unseen Silver Screen in Contact Sheets, 1951-1997 collects those direct prints that photographers used for selection and editing purposes in the pre-digital age, assembling unused and previously unseen behind-the-scenes photos and publicity shots for such iconic films as Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Giant, Taxi Driver, Rear Window, and Some Like It Hot. They’re the cinematic equivalent of bootleg recordings — the almost-final versions, in which you see the elements slowly drifting together — as well as a fascinating document of Hollywood’s always-delicate process of packaging and presenting its product. We were lucky enough to get a look at a few pages from the book; check them out after the jump. … Read More

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Amazing Playing Cards Inspired by Classic Cult Movies

If you’re a fan of cult movies, there are plenty of ways to show your love for them: posters on your wall, T-shirts on your chest, pictures in your social media profiles. But the good folks at the creative agency Human After All went beyond those obvious vehicles to find a genuinely cool bit of cult movie merchandising: cult movie playing cards, with each card in the deck illustrating a cinematic favorite. The decks are in production now, but its makers were kind enough to send us over a few samples; check them out after the jump, and follow them on Twitter or go to their website to find out how to get a set of your own. … Read More

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The Stories Behind 10 Iconic Movie Scenes

Sixty years ago today, Marilyn Monroe stepped on a subway grate and made movie history. She was shooting a film called The Seven-Year Itch in New York City, and the image of her on the grate, the train passing underneath blowing up her skirt, would become one of the most iconic in all of cinema. To commemorate that magic movie moment, we’ve gathered behind-the-scenes tales of that and nine other classic movie scenes. (We didn’t include Raiders. Harrison Ford shot the guy with the sword instead of fighting him because he had the trots. We’re assuming you knew that one.) … Read More

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Wickedly Inventive Happy Meal Tie-Ins for Cult Movies

The movie tie-in McDonald’s Happy Meal is one of our most venerable cultural barometers, a big “get” for family movies hoping to market directly to their most vocal consumers. Starting with Star Trek: The Motion Picture back in 1979 (the same year the Happy Meal rolled out), Disney hits, superhero smashes, and other family favorites have used the cardboard panels of the Happy Meal and the toy inside to hawk their cinematic wares. But what if Happy Meals were used to market slightly more adult fare? This is the question asked by Pinterest artist Newt Clements, who’s made an extensive collection of imaginary Happy Meals that we really, really wish existed. … Read More

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Get More Excited For Martin Scorsese’s ‘New York Review of Books’ Doc With the Trailer

Martin Scorsese plus the New York Review of Books? It’s a match made in New York heaven, isn’t it? But,… Read More

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10 TV Episodes Directed by Famous Filmmakers

After two decades away, Lars Von Trier will return to television with The House That Jack Built, a high-end drama. No further details have been released, but based on the director’s controversial career in film — including the two-part Nymphomaniac — there is no doubt that The House That Jack Built will immediately become must-see television. Until that show premieres (it isn’t even filming until 2016), here are some other famous film directors who have directed television. … Read More

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