Maya Rudolph

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The Best Celebrity Graduation Speeches of 2015

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It’s after Memorial Day, which means that across the country, grills have been rolled out, beach towels unfurled, and thousands of college grads unleashed into the real world. Helping them make the transition are big-name commencement speakers dispensing advice with varying degrees of seriousness. Robert De Niro’s grabbed headlines with his already-infamous “yeah, you’re fucked” address at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts (though his follow-up — “the good news is that’s not a bad place to start” — got slightly less attention). Here are some other highlights from the 2015 commencement season, from tongue-in-cheek to earnest to everything in… Read More

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The 5 ‘SNL 40′ Sketches You Absolutely Have to Watch

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Last night, during NBC’s celebration of Saturday Night Live‘s 40th anniversary, viewers were treated to three hours of familiar faces and sketches — both live sketches and montages of classic ones. And just like every other episode of SNL, the new sketches were hit or miss. But there were still plenty of gems found in the mix. From the successful return of fan favorite “Celebrity Jeopardy” to a wonderfully long segment featuring Maya Rudolph’s perfect Beyoncé impression, here are five SNL 40 sketches everyone will be talking about.
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Paul Thomas Anderson and the cast of "Inherent Vice" at the New York Film Festival

Paul Thomas Anderson’s ‘Inherent Vice’ Is a Breezy, Bizarre Blast

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Paul Thomas Anderson took five years to make his 2007 oil epic There Will Be Blood. He took another five years to make 2012’s Scientology-inspired The Master. He banged out his adaptation of Thomas Pynchon’s Inherent Vice in two, and you can feel the difference—in the best possible way. The two films that preceded it marked the filmmaker’s transition from wunderkind to Serious Artist; by turns wrenching, challenging, and borderline impenetrable, they plunged the depths of American history and the American soul. Vice, by contrast, is a slang-y, breezy lark, a picture whose two-and-a-half-hour running time, Oscar-friendly release date, and premiere as the Centerpiece selection at the New York Film Festival make it sound like a more important movie than it is—or, more importantly, than Anderson seems to think it is. After a decade spent making two films that are like pressure cookers, he was clearly ready to blow off some steam.
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