Meryl Streep

30 Writers’ Invaluable Advice to Graduates

Graduation season is fast approaching, the time of the year when some of our favorite writers are tasked with summing up the wisdom to be accrued from the process of growing up in ten succinct minutes of witty truth. These days, a successful graduation speech has the very real chance of going viral, and then living forever as a book: from David Foster Wallace’s This Is Water: Some Thoughts, Delivered on a Significant Occasion, About Living a Compassionate Life to Neil Gaiman’s Make Good Art, the best graduation speeches are finding a new life. This crop includes the brand-new Congratulations, By the Way: Some Thoughts on Kindness by George Saunders, a pretty-in-print encapsulation of his 2013 Syracuse Graduation speech. It’s reason enough to collect 30 of the best, wisest, and pithiest pieces of advice from the greatest writers to attempt the graduation… Read More

  • 0

The 12 Oscars 2014 Moments Everyone Is Talking About

Seeing as how they clocked in at a back-breaking three hours and 34 minutes, you could be forgiven for checking out of the 86th Academy Awards ceremony early (or frankly, passing on it altogether—I mean, how about that episode of True Detective?). But don’t worry, we’ve got you covered; your Flavorwire sat through the whole damn thing, and put together the dozen moments that blew up the Twittersphere, burned down our Oscar parties, and will be on everyone’s tongues for a good, oh, 12 hours… Read More

  • 0

A Complete History of Meryl Streep at the Oscars

Meryl Streep is the ultimate un-hateable celebrity. She’s 64 years old, she has remained a steady presence in Hollywood for over four decades. She’s a national treasure. She can make oatmeal sound sexy, and she is thanked more often than God in acceptance speeches. The world is her fan club. That aside, she’s also a superb actress, with the distinguished honor of being awarded the most Oscars nominations of any thespian, with a whopping 18 nominations and three wins under her belt. (To put it another way, the longest time she’s gone without an Oscar nomination since her first is four years.) This is a journey through her illustrious Oscar history. … Read More

  • 0

Is ‘Fantastic Mr. Fox’ the Quintessential Wes Anderson Movie?

When it was released back in the fall of 2009, Fantastic Mr. Fox (out today in a new DVD and Blu-ray special edition from the Criterion Collection) seemed a peculiar detour in the career of co-writer/director Wes Anderson — why on earth was this idiosyncratic indie auteur making what was, by any measure, a kids’ movie? It was a question being asked elsewhere that fall as well; Spike Jonze had just released Where the Wild Things Are, his long-in-the-making adaptation of Maurice Sendak’s iconic picture book, while Martin Scorsese had just announced his next film, a family-friendly adaptation of the young adult novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret. But what is fascinating about Anderson’s film (and Jonze’s, and, ultimately, Scorsese’s) is how little he had to adjust his vision to make a “kids’ movie.” In fact, there is an argument to be made that Fantastic Mr. Fox may be the purest distillation of Anderson’s specific, inimitable style. … Read More

  • 0

50 Essential Movies About Exhilaratingly Bad Women

Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street is a three-hour epic featuring a number of debaucheries committed by the men who rule the country’s financial institutions. While the film has sparked debate over its depiction of drugs and sex, many critics have complained of its lack of a feminine perspective. If you’re looking for the chance to see female characters going head-to-head with their devious male counterparts, you’ll likely have to skip Scorsese’s latest picture. The good news, however, is that cinema has a long history of devious women and femmes fatales. Here are 50 of the most notorious and downright thrilling bad women in movie… Read More

  • 0

‘August: Osage County’ Is a Forgettable Film, But Offers the Year’s Best Performances

When Tracy Letts’ epic three-hour play August: Osage County debuted on Broadway in October 2007 after a critically acclaimed run at Steppenwolf Theatre Company in Chicago (where Letts is an ensemble member), it was immediately clear that it was a modern theatrical classic. The play took well-worn territory — the dysfunctional family drama — and turned it on its head: the lengthy production boasted an impressive set (a three-story house) and a cast of 13 characters who throughout the evening yelled and screamed, climbed over tables, and broke down in tears. It was both funny and depressing, and it was an immediate hit, spawning a national tour and various international productions. Even before Letts nabbed a Pulitzer Prize and the production swept the Tony Awards, it was clear August would become a film. … Read More

  • 0

The 20 Essential Movies About Breaking Up

Surely you don’t need to be reminded how hard it can be to fall out of love. But for those whose romantic pursuits have ended in ways they consider less than ideal, there are plenty of movies to look to for comfort — if only as reminders that romantic disappointments and those horrific related emotions are quite commonplace. Here are 20 films that are essential viewing when you’re going through a breakup, because you can only listen to “Someone Like You” so many times (although if you’re in need of some breakup music, check out our list of the best breakup albums of all… Read More

  • 0