New York City

Martin Scorsese’s ‘The 50 Year Argument’ Is a Love Letter to Intellectuals

There is a lot of reading in The 50 Year Argument, a documentary about the venerable institution The New York Review of Books and its 50-year history of being engaged with the world. Notably, the documentary is the work of Martin Scorsese and his co-director David Tedeschi, and the two longtime filmmakers’ imprint on this doc is crucial: you can imagine it being tedious talking-head boredom in lesser hands (it is, at points, even in Scorsese’s hands — more like the 50 year nap, am I right?), but the directors skillfully pull off the trick that, by telling the story of a publication, they’re telling a story of the culture shifts of the last 50 years, in words and in actions. … Read More

  • 0

50 Underground Filmmakers Everyone Should Know

We’re coming to the close of a great retrospective of Joe Sarno’s works at New York’s Anthology Film Archives, ending September 26. Sarno was one of the sexploitation genre’s key auteurs, and his films evoke the independent spirit of the underground film movement — movies popularized during the ‘60s that pushed the boundaries of technique and narrative with experimental artistry. These pictures produced outside the commercial moviemaking industry ranged from the subversive to the formless, delighting in explicit subjects and exploring radical in-camera editing. Crucial as he is, Sarno is just one of these 50 underground filmmakers you should… Read More

  • 0

Where DIY Music Meets Tech Culture: Searching for Future Sounds at the World Maker Faire

What makes a “maker”? By definition, the term can apply to artists, crafters, and anyone who creates anything. But the past decade has seen a more specific “maker movement” emerge amongst nerds and techies, one focused on making mediums like electronics, robotics, and 3D printing more accessible for hobbyists, connecting the dots between open-source tech projects and Etsy-centered handmade craft culture. … Read More

  • 0

Haunting Black-and-White Photos of ‘Bronx Boys’ Capture the Real New York

Starting with an assignment for Look Magazine in 1977, photographer Stephen Shames captured the comping-of-age of a group of boys growing up in the Bronx, then one of the grittiest and poorest neighborhoods in the United States. It was a magazine assignment that became a life’s work, because Shames followed this group of young men from 1977 – 2000 through all corners of their lives, navigating poverty and drug addiction in beautifully personal, intimate photos about growing up in New York City. … Read More

  • 0

Dramatic Photos of New York City’s East Village Locations in 1984 and Today

New York City has undergone some dramatic changes over the past several decades. Landmarks like Kim’s Video & Music are shuttering their doors, and rents are skyrocketing more each year. One neighborhood that has seen a major shift is the East Village. In 1984, photographer Daniel Root, who we learned of on Kottke, documented the area—the way most people think of it, as it appears in the movies. Today, he has made it his mission to revisit the locations in his images to document their current state. The EV NY project reveals some fascinating and dramatic transformations. Gentrification has scrubbed the East Village’s former graffiti-covered walls. See what you make of New York City’s East Village 30 years ago versus today in our gallery. … Read More

  • 0

25 Must-Read Books For the Fall

Fall! It’s a time for picking apples, wearing plaid, watching the leaves change color, and catching up on the season’s most beguiling new book releases. Fall is when the big houses bring out the big names, from Lena Dunham’s hotly anticipated book of essays, Not That Kind of Girl, to new work from future predictors Stephen Johnson and Nicholas Carr, to stories from reliable geniuses like Marilynne Robinson and Denis Johnson. We pared down a list of a million fascinating looking books (Good luck, Christian Rudder’s Dataclysm. Better list next time, Christos Tsiolkas’s well received Barracuda. I see you, Charles Burns’ Sugar Skull) to a workable group of 25 of the fall season’s must-reads. Add them to your list, and dominate cocktail parties all season long. … Read More

  • 0

A Gritty Photo Tribute to 1970s and 1980s New York City

Former mayor Rudy Giuliani tried to scrub New York City clean in the 1990s, but nostalgia for notoriously gritty New York in the ‘70s and ‘80s remains at an all-time high. An exhibition at Lot 180 remembers a city that was, with a collection of photos, vinyl cover art, posters, and more. Cultural icons like Andy Warhol, Debbie Harry, and Jean-Michel Basquiat (and his graffiti tag SAMO) populate the collection. This isn’t the “Disneyfied” New York City of today. Street photography from artists such as Robert Herman and Fernando Natalici depict the city’s graffiti-filled trains, the XXX theaters of Times Square, and other relics of a bygone era. The exhibition, which you can preview in our photo gallery, runs through September 1. … Read More

  • 0

The 25 Greatest Songs About City Life

Most big cities with any sort of history have a song. If that city’s New York, it has about 1000 of ‘em. But to be a classic of the genre, the song has to speak to bigger themes about city life, be it the hustle, the danger, or the beauty below the filth. Here are the 25 best, from Lou Reed to Nas to The… Read More

  • 0

Memorable Movie Scenes in Museums

This week, two of the most prestigious cultural institutions in the world celebrate anniversaries — the Smithsonian and the Louvre (168 and 221 years respectively). The cultural impact each museum has had on our society is astounding — making them rich locations for filmmakers throughout history. We explored ten scenes in cinema set inside (and around) museums that make use of the cultural and historical sites as beautiful backdrops, but also a metaphorical crossroads of human connection. … Read More

  • 0

Incredible Photos of Body-Painted People Disappearing Into New York Landmarks

Taking “blending in” to a whole new level, body painter Trina Merry draws her inspiration from New York city landmarks like Central Park and the Guggenheim Museum. Then she pays tribute to them on the bodies of models, who she photographs seamlessly integrated into the urban landscape. Pictured in perspective, it’s hard to tell where the people end and the buildings begin. Click through for a stunning look at the Brooklyn Bridge, the New York City skyline, and the human bodies Merry paints them on, in a series we spotted via Visual News. … Read More

  • 0
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,660 other followers