New York City

Newly Discovered Artworks from Provocative Performance Artist and New York City Art-World Icon Colette

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Before Madonna and Lady Gaga were exploring the boundaries of gender and adopting fashionable personas for the stage, pioneering performance artist Colette, aka Colette Justine, had established herself as a New York art-world icon doing just that. In her 1973 debut, Colette “used stuff like ruched parachute silk to turn her living space into a walk-in artwork.” Colette is the subject of a new online exhibition at Gallery 98, which features a group of rediscovered works from the provocative artist, unearthed from her old storage spaces in Germany — where Colette currently resides (and lived/worked for a time during the 1980s).
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Candid Lunchtime Portraits of Fashionable New Yorkers in the 1970s

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On the average lunch break in New York City (or any major city around the world), most people have their heads buried in an electronic device. But in the 1970s, people out and about during their break relied on the art of conversation. Between 1977 and 1980, photographer Charles H. Traub took his camera to the streets to capture New Yorkers (as well as residents in Chicago and European cities) at lunchtime.
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From ’70s NYC Icons to Noble Animals: Peter Hujar’s Poetic Portraits and Sweeping Cityscapes

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Peter Hujar, known for his candid and intimate black-and-white portraits, photographed some of the most exciting minds and personalities of the 20th century. Peter Hujar: 21 Pictures, presented by Fraenkel Gallery from January 7 to March 5, 2016 (the fourth solo exhibition of Hujar’s work), will explore the artist’s 30-year career, including his less familiar photos of gritty city life in the ‘70s and ‘80s, seascapes, still lifes, and animals.
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‘Punk’ Magazine’s Iconic Covers That Captured the Rise of the ’70s NYC Scene

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Artist John Holmstrom, publisher Ged Dunn, and journalist Legs McNeil started Punk magazine in 1976 as former high school friends looking for scene cred and free drinks. The cartoons meets rock fanzine captured the flavor of New York City’s Lower East Side and its thriving underground art and music world. Forty years later, gallery and performance space Howl! Happening is looking back at Punk’s colorful history with an exhibition commemorating the magazine’s first issue, featuring Loud Reed on the cover (drawn by Holmstrom). The show runs January 14 to January 30.
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Revisiting Iconic Land Artist Robert Smithson’s Forgotten New York Pop Art Years

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Robert Smithson is often remembered for his pioneering contributions to the Land Art/Earthworks movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s (Spiral Jetty being, perhaps, his most famous creation). But the artist also exhibited works during the early Pop Art movement while immersed in the downtown New York art scene in 1962-64. This experimental period in Smithson’s life is the focus of the exhibit Pop, on view at the James Cohan gallery on the Lower East Side through January 10, 2016.
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Never-Before-Seen Photos From the New York City Art World in the ’80s

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Paige Powell, who became the associate publisher of Andy Warhol’s Interview, arrived in New York City from Oregon in 1980. With camcorder and camera in hand, Powell joined the inner circle of art-scene luminaries and photographed them over the next decade. Jean-Michel Basquiat, her partner from ’82 to ’84 (captured in a series of reclining nudes by Powell), Francesco and Alba Clemente, Tama Janowitz, Stephen Sprouse, Madonna, and Keith Haring were just a few of her subjects.
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