Occupy Wall Street

It’s “A Matter of Time” Until New Protests Explode: Author Michael Gould-Wartofsky on Occupy’s Past and Future

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On a freezing Friday afternoon last week, New York’s Zuccotti Park was empty of anything except piles of dirty and frozen snow, a nondescript thoroughfare for cold tourists and bargain shoppers on their way to Century 21. Yet those of us who were regular visitors to the Occupy Wall Street encampment here in 2011 don’t even have to close our eyes to conjure up tents, a kitchen, signs, and hundreds of simultaneous debates happening on every street corner of Liberty Plaza.
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On Activism and Cynicism: An Hour Waiting for Russell Brand in Zuccotti Park

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I walked down to Zuccotti Park yesterday afternoon. I haven’t been there since Occupy Wall Street was forcibly removed from the park in November 2011. And, look, I’ll admit it — I never went to the park during Occupy, either. Like many people, I suspect, I’ve always had an uneasy relationship with activism — or, perhaps more accurately, with activists. Insofar as Occupy had defined goals (and one of the smartest and most interesting things about the movement was its inclusivity), I supported them — anyone who reads Flavorwire regularly will be unsurprised to know that we often lean left of center. But when it comes to direct action or marches or such things, I have always had a problem, and that problem has a name: drum circles.
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The Best Things We Read on the Internet This Week: Faulkner, Baldwin, the Other Side of Silicon Valley

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Listicles, tweets, your ex’s Facebook status, picture of dogs wearing costumes — the internet offers no shortage of entertaining stuff to look at. But there’s plenty of substantial writing out there, too, the pieces you spend a few minutes reading and a long time thinking about after you’ve closed the tab. In this weekly feature, Flavorwire shares the best of that category. This week: the lack of James Baldwin in high schools, the other side of Silicon Valley, an Occupy Wall Street protestor on trial, and more.
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The Fascinatingly Flexible Political Subtext of ‘The Hunger Games: Catching Fire’

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Catching Fire, the second film adaptation of Suzanne Collins’ Hunger Games trilogy (a trilogy which, true to their current style, Hollywood is adapting into four films), arrives on screen with the confidence of a film that knows it’s going to gross a bajillion dollars. It is a brisk, exciting, well-acted entertainment, and those elements, in addition to the built-in audience of Collins’ voracious readers, are the most logical explanation for the franchise’s massive popularity. But in viewing the two films back-to-back this week, another theory seems worth mentioning as well: the series’ political subtext, which is present and potent, yet flexible enough to latch on to the ideology of your choice. The Hunger Games is “political” without actually having to stand for anything.
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