Paul Giamatti

‘Inside Amy Schumer’s’ 12 Angry Men, Ranked

Every episode of Inside Amy Schumer deserves to be talked about, but there’s always one segment that rises above the rest and necessitates a little extra conversation. In lieu of recapping full episodes, we’re here to help you with water-cooler conversation by letting you know which sketch was an absolute must-watch. … Read More

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Flavorwire’s Guide to 2015 Summer Movies

This Friday, just like the first weekend of every May since 2007, a new movie based on a Marvel comic book will open in thousands of theaters across the country, will make all the money, and will serve as the official starter pistol for summer movie season. And for many a seasoned moviegoer, that’s a cue for despair; after all, summer has become synonymous with big, bloated, stupid blockbusters of the Transformers school. And make no mistake, there’s plenty of those on the runway this season (how ya doin’, Terminator Genisys, it’s pretty funny that you’re actually going with that spelling). But don’t go into cinematic hibernation just yet; there’s also a steady stream of first-rate indie-flick counterprogramming on the runway, and some of the big movies actually sound pretty good. So, as a public service to you, the discerning moviegoer, we’ve assembled a month-by-month look at what might actually be worth your time and… Read More

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Flavorwire’s 10 Most Anticipated Movies of 2015

A new year is upon us, and a peek ahead at 2015’s cinematic offerings is… well, kinda depressing. As you peruse the many 2015 preview pieces on movie sites, there’s a noticeable sameness — namely because they’re chock full of sequels. And some of those sequels (The Avengers, Mad Max, The Hunger Games, Pitch Perfect, Magic Mike, Mission: Impossible, and, yes, Star Wars) might be great! But their domination of said lists speaks to the weakness of said lists; we’re banking anticipation almost exclusively on known quantities, from earlier films and filmmakers. And with Sundance and the rest of the spring festivals still on the horizon, we can’t yet guess at the smaller sleepers. BUT, nonetheless, we present this look at a few slightly off-the-grid and out-of-the-box movies that might be worth talking about this… Read More

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50 Great Pre-Fame Performances by Famous Actors

This week, the Criterion Collection is releasing a double bill of the mid-‘60s Westerns The Shooting and Ride the Whirlwind, a treat not only for fans of revisionist Westerns and director Monte Hellman, but also for those who admire Jack Nicholson, here seen in two terrific performances that predate his breakthrough in Easy Rider. There’s a specific kind of pleasure in revisiting the early work of actors who would later become famous — not the roles that made them stars, but their earlier, quieter gigs, in which we glimpse an actor just trying to do good work, yet already exhibiting the spark that would mark them for fame. Here are a few of our… Read More

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Damien Lewis and Paul Giamatti Cast in Showtime’s High-Finance Series, ‘Billions’

Both Damien Lewis (who you probably know as the tiny-lipped (but attractively!), politically confused love interest/threat to America/American hero on Homeland) and… Read More

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It’s Time to Kill the Spider-Man Franchise

I can’t speak for anyone else, but after spending a total of 665 minutes with him, in five movies over the course of a decade, I think it’s safe to say that I know all I need to know about Spider-Man. The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is out in theaters Friday, and it will certainly make a bazillion dollars, but after you sit through it — all 142 fucking minutes of it — it’s very hard to work up a compelling reason that it needed to exist, aside from the aforementioned bazillion dollars. It’s not just that it’s clumsily executed, aggressively stupid, and excruciatingly overlong (did I mention the 142 minutes?). It’s that, five films in, they’re still giving us — I’m not making this up — an origin story. Attention, Hollywood: We get it. Shy kid, fights crime, flies around, shoots the webs. We don’t need a Russian novel’s worth of backstory on this character; at this point, I know more about Peter Parker’s youth than the childhoods of people I share a bloodline with. … Read More

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This Week’s Top 5 TV Moments: Giamatti Plays God

There are scores of TV shows out there, with dozens of new episodes each week, not to mention everything you can find on Hulu Plus, Netflix streaming, and HBO Go. How’s a viewer to keep up? To help you sort through all that television has to offer, Flavorwire is compiling the five best moments on TV each week. This time, Inside Amy Schumer pulls in a prominent guest star as How I Met Your Mother bows out for good. … Read More

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‘Saving Mr. Banks': Walt Disney Pictures’ Nauseating Walt Disney Propaganda Film

Walt Disney was one of the most important figures in the history of motion pictures, a visionary storyteller, entertainer, and entrepreneur. He also allied himself with anti-Semitic organizations, extended a warm Hollywood welcome to Leni Riefenstahl, began a tradition of worker exploitation that persists in his organization today, and was a key instigator in the Communist witch hunts of the 1950s. In other words, he was a man of contradictions, and those contradictions could make for a juicy and rich biopic. Saving Mr. Banks is not that biopic. Instead, it is the story of a Magic Mogul who helped a sad woman overcome her Daddy Issues, and, while they’re at it, of how a multinational corporation crushed an idiosyncratic artist (for her own good!). It also may be the most self-congratulatory bit of hagiography Hollywood has ever produced, and that’s saying something. … Read More

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’12 Years a Slave’ Bears Witness to the Harrowing Reality of Slavery

“Your story, it is amazing. And in no good way,” Bass (Brad Pitt) tells Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor) near the end of 12 Years a Slave, the remarkable new film from director Steve McQueen (Hunger, Shame). He’s right; Northup was a real man, an educated, sophisticated, free black man from Saratoga, New York who was kidnapped in 1841 and sold into slavery in Louisiana. Yet his extraordinary narrative (adapted by John Ridley from Northup’s memoir) is not why 12 Years a Slave is such a powerful experience. It is because of the vividness with which McQueen dramatizes the utter brutality of Northup’s everyday life as man treated as though he were less than one. … Read More

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