Paul Thomas Anderson

Tom Ewell and Marilyn Monroe in “The Seven Year Itch”

The Stories Behind 10 Iconic Movie Scenes

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Sixty years ago today, Marilyn Monroe stepped on a subway grate and made movie history. She was shooting a film called The Seven-Year Itch in New York City, and the image of her on the grate, the train passing underneath blowing up her skirt, would become one of the most iconic in all of cinema. To commemorate that magic movie moment, we’ve gathered behind-the-scenes tales of that and nine other classic movie scenes. (We didn’t include Raiders. Harrison Ford shot the guy with the sword instead of fighting him because he had the trots. We’re assuming you knew that one.)
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Joaquin Phoenix and Josh Brolin in "Inherent Vice"

25 Must-See Movies For the Fall

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Hey there reader, been to the movies lately? If the box office reports are any indication, I’m guessing not — and who can blame you? We’re currently in the weird dead zone between the tentpole blockbusters of the summer and the prestige, Oscar-friendly pictures (and, increasingly, tentpole blockbusters) of the fall. But relief will be here soon enough, so in the interest of helping you mark up your movie-going calendar, we’re looking ahead to the fall films we’re anticipating most.
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Films You Didn’t Realize Were Based on Newspaper and Magazine Articles

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Hollywood has had a long-term romance with literature. Big-screen adaptations of novels (and, yes, comic books) are at an all-time high, but cinema has frequently looked to the school of journalism for its source material. This weekend marks the 38th publication anniversary of New York Magazine’s “The Tribal Rites of the New Saturday Night” by Nik Cohn, which led to the creation of the wildly popular 1977 film Saturday Night Fever, starring John Travolta. The movie helped make disco a global sensation and sported one of the best-selling soundtrack albums of all time. But there’s more to Cohn’s story — and these other newspaper and magazine articles that inspired films. See what stories, true and fiction, informed some cinema’s biggest hits — many you probably didn’t realize actually started life between the pages.
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Flavorwire Exclusive: Owen Ashworth’s Witty, Whimsical Drawings of Iconic Filmmakers

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If you’re as big a fan as we are of Owen Ashworth — the man formerly known as Casiotone for the Painfully Alone, now recording under the Advance Base moniker — you’ll know that his albums have often been adorned by his own rather whimsical drawings. Well, now he’s extended his interest in art into a whole book of illustrations. Titled Legends of the Silver Screen, it features idiosyncratic portraits of famous film directors, each accompanied by an imaginary signature. The book is out in the US at the end of March (pre-orders are open now), but publishers Belly Kids have been kind enough to share a selection of the images with us for this exclusive pre-release gallery.
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Remembering (and Reconciling) the Brilliance of Philip Seymour Hoffman

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The first reactions, unsurprisingly, were shock and sadness. And then the timelines started to fill with clips from over two decades of rich, varied, heartfelt work, and with each new one, his death sounded another little jolt: “Oh God, right, he was in that too.” But there was one common thread in Philip Seymour Hoffman’s work: he was an actor of remarkable control. Many of his best performances conveyed that control, and even when he played disorderly characters, there was never a fear of Hoffman losing control of them. And that, more than his age or his persona or the sordid details of his death scene, may be the most shocking thing about his passing: that it was so clearly the death of a man who had lost control of a crippling… Read More