Philip K. Dick

6 Books That Will Prepare You for the Inevitable Robot Uprising

“Our great-grandparents loved killer robots. So do we. But why?” Daniel H. Wilson asks that question in the foreword of the short story collection he edited, Robot Uprisings, which includes work by Cory Doctrow, Scott Sigler, Charles Yu, Robin Wasserman, and many others. It’s full of stories of the near-future, when the things we created, as Jeff Abbott puts it in his piece, “wanted to be just like us.” … Read More

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10 Fascinating Fictional Cities in Film

It’s been two years since Wes Anderson’s last film, and we’ve been having serious whimsy withdrawal. The director’s latest, The Grand Budapest Hotel, invites audiences to a fictional spa town, the Republic of Zubrowka. In typical Anderson fashion, the filmmaker has decked out the European hotel, leaving no detail unturned:

Even the smallest concrete yet imaginary element of Grand Budapest‘s main setting… was fanatically created by Anderson and company, down to its newspaper of record, the Trans-Alpine Yodel, and its pastry of choice, the mouthwatering Courtesan au chocolat, always packaged in the unmistakable pink boxes from Mendl’s Patisserie.

Anderon’s immersive environs remind us of other fictional film locales that transport us to fascinating worlds of wonder and mystery. Here are ten cities, big and small, that stem from the wild imaginations of their creators. … Read More

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Celebrate Philip K. Dick’s 85th Birthday With Mindbending Art From His Paperback Novels

If there is such thing as a holy day for science fiction fans, Philip K. Dick’s birthday is it. Born 85 years ago today in 1928, the author (who died in 1982) has attracted the sort of diehard followers who consider him a prophet, predicting and problematizing the future in stories whose common threads include totalitarian governments, religion, and — maybe most famously — robots. … Read More

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Books About Banned and Dangerous Books

Another year remembering the books that are mad, bad, and dangerous to know (we say this with a grin, of course) is coming to a close. Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to read, while drawing attention to literature that has been challenged or banned. The number of books that have struggled against censorship is staggering, but there are also books about books that are considered a menace to society. Here are several of them. Leave us your picks, below. … Read More

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Staff Picks: Flavorwire’s Favorite Cultural Things This Week

Need a great book to read, album to listen to, or TV show to get hooked on? The Flavorwire team is here to help: in this weekly feature, our editorial staffers recommend the cultural object or experience they’ve enjoyed most in the past seven days. Click through for our picks, and tell us what you’ve been loving in the comments. … Read More

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50 Sci-Fi/Fantasy Novels That Everyone Should Read

People say it all the time: they’d love to get into science fiction or fantasy, but they’ve no idea where to start. If this is you (or if you’re one of those stubborn folks who looks snootily down on genre), listen up. Your trusty Flavorwire editors have a few suggestions for you — that is, a whole 50 sci-fi and fantasy novels that are well worth your time, whether you’re brand new to the concept of dragons and/or spaceships or a seasoned… Read More

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What to Read While You’re Missing Your Favorite TV Shows

It’s August, and there’s still nothing on TV. So what to do with all that free time in the evenings? Pick up a book, of course. And if you’re at a loss, your obliging Flavorwire editors have got you covered. After all, books are kind of like television, except better for you (sometimes). After the jump, a guide to what to read based on your all-time favorite TV shows (both current and past) — because fans of The Sopranos don’t necessarily want to read the same book as fans of Buffy. Check out our suggestions after the jump, and add your own in the comments. … Read More

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Amazing Psychedelic Vintage Norwegian Sci-Fi Book Covers

They just don’t make book covers the way they used to. That is: epically weird, like this series of science fiction books published by Norwegian imprint Lanterne in the ’60s and ’70s and spotted by Caustic Cover Critic. Designed by Peter Haars, the covers are not only deliciously bizarre and psychedelic, but also pretty compelling, as book covers go. Check out some highlights from the series after the jump, and then head over to this Flickr page for more. … Read More

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10 Authors Who Loved the Film Adaptations of Their Books

Last week, we had a good laugh at the recently uncovered notes from the producers of Blade Runner, who seemed united in their hatred for the “deadly dull” sci-fi noir that would prove one of the most influential movies of the ‘80s. But it’s important to remember that some of those casually involved in the production actually liked it quite a bit — particularly Philip K. Dick, whose book Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was the basis of Ridley Scott’s film. And while there’s a long (and enjoyable) history of authors loathing what Hollywood does to their books, there are a few examples of writers who are utterly delighted with their page-to-film adaptations. We’ve collected them for you after the jump. … Read More

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The 10 Greatest Dystopian Love Stories in Literature

This week saw the release of the brilliant Ariel Djanikian‘s debut novel, The Office of Mercy. Djanikian’s book drops you into a deliciously paranoid world that we’re confident will go down in history with the best of them, so we asked her to put together a list of her favorite dystopian love stories (just be sure to mentally add The Office of Mercy to her list). Here’s what she told us: “Dystopian tales seem to go hand-in-hand with scintillating, high-octane love stories: perhaps because dire circumstances have a knack of drawing people together, perhaps because claustrophobic repression makes the highs and lows of love affairs that much more potent. These ten books boast plenty of heart-stopping love triangles, as well as romantic pairings with some changes: robots, clones, and cyborgs get in on the action. They are love affairs that question how much feeling we have to offer, and how much trust we can risk in the face of political pressures. Love is never the cure-all for these characters, but it can be an intervention, as Jeanette Winterson says, against powers of destruction.” … Read More

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