photography

“I’m More Into Outsiders Than Insiders”: Auteur Bruce LaBruce on His Queer Canon, Porn, and Why Zombies Are Anti-Capitalist

I’m talking via Skype with Canadian queer auteur Bruce LaBruce, who tells me he hasn’t been in New York for a while. The city’s formerly seedy red-light district, Times Square, feels like a mythic entity since the Disneyfication of Manhattan — an oddly more perverse environment to welcome back one of cinema’s greatest provocateurs. MoMA’s retrospective honoring LaBruce runs from April 23 until May 2 and will be attended by the director. With three projects currently in development — one unannounced, a “slightly mythological, melodramatic film about twincest,” and a “low-budget, experimental film that is a loose sequel to the The Raspberry Reich, about feminist revolutionaries, or terrorists, basically” — LaBruce spoke about the trajectory of his underground career, insights into his queer canon, and those moments in his films that even he questioned. … Read More

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Michael Massaia’s ‘Signals Crossed’ Photos Reveal Natural Secrets in LED Billboards

If you happen to raise your eyes to the ubiquitous LED billboards in Times Square while you’re trying to push your way past the giant amoeba of tourists, you might see a flashing, building-sized advertisement for Kodak or Pepsi. But there’s more to those corporate images than you think. … Read More

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Fantastical European Architectural Collages

The fictional collages of German artist Matthias Jung sprout from the misty hills and marshes like pastoral apparitions. They appear to be whimsical castles torn from the pages of a European folk tale. Jung’s architectural creations are seamless enough to make you do a double take (which we did after spotting them on Colossal) and charming because of their slightly stitched-together appearance. Details such as sheep grazing on grassy rooftops and miniature forests where we’d least expect them add to the fantastical structures. … Read More

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Stunning Close-Up Photos of the Natural World From ‘Animal Earth’

In Animal Earth: The Amazing Diversity of Living Creatures, zoologist Ross Piper shares stunning photos of the animals who are the building blocks of our world. His photos capture a side of the animal kingdom we don’t see so often, and in this gorgeous book, we get new appreciation for the little guys and the microscopic specks of dust who are essential to the evolution of humanity and the earth. The book’s available March 20, but Thames and Hudson were kind enough to share an exclusive gallery of photos — click through for our favorites. … Read More

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Romantic Tree Carvings in New York City’s Forgotten Forests

It’s a time-honored tradition to carve a lover’s initials into a tree. And you’ll often see the names of bands and random teen lingo carved into bark. It’s a romantic record of gleefully reckless youth and idyllic young love. Artist Mary Reilly uses photography, powdered graphite, and lead graphite on paper to commemorate these “anonymous small crimes of passion.” Her exhibition at New York City’s Garvey|Simon Art Access, which closes today, memorializes the tree carvings found within the woods of Alley Pond Park, Queens. The gallery writes of her process: … Read More

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The Most Ridiculous Amazon Fine Art Reviews

Ah, Amazon. Your one-stop shop for everything soon to be delivered by a drone near you. But did you know that Amazon sells fine art? We’re talking gallery-represented, seriously expensive fine art. And it turns out that the Amazon Fine Art page is like some kind of bizarro world where prints by famous artists such as Andy Warhol and Andres Serrano live alongside unknowns. Like all things Amazon, commenters prowl the listings to do as much damage as they can. Depending on your taste in art, the creators either deserve it or are unfortunate victims. Here are a few of the funny (and just plain weird) things they’ve said. … Read More

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‘Sports Illustrated’ Lays Off Last of Its Staffers in Photography Department

Sports Illustrated has officially laid off the last six staff photographers in their photo department. Director of photography Brad Smith… Read More

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Breathtaking Neon-Tinged Aerial Shots of New York City at Night

New York City has been photographed in many, many ways: from above, from below, from street level, its traffic often held in an extended exposure to create that famed river of lights. Yet these photos by Vincent Laforet, which came our way via Storehouse, manage to do something new, their tilt-shift perspectives leveling the playing field and re-contextualizing the funhouse lights of Times Square. Laforet captures the symmetry and chaos of the nighttime city, the neon and geometry of which bring to mind a kind of futuristic cityscape from Sim City rather than an actual, real-life thing. More of Laforet’s work, some of which does not look at all like this particular project, can be found at his website. … Read More

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50 Uncanny Artworks

Pop surrealists and lowbrow artists owe a debt of gratitude to Margaret Keane — painter of melancholic, saucer-eyed little girls. Tim Burton’s Keane biopic Big Eyes, in theaters December 25, tells the story of the tumultuous relationship Keane had with husband Walter, who took credit for her work. Amy Adams plays the artist, who struggles against her husband (played by Christoph Waltz) for control of her art. “I was as sad as that painting,” Keane said in a recent interview with Eye on the Bay, pointing to one of her famous works. “I was thinking, ‘What is all this about? Why is life so sad?’” The world-weary waifs in Keane’s paintings are doll-like and uncanny. Freud defined the uncanny as the “unhome,” or the opposite of familiar. Keane’s girls feel too fragile for this world. Here is a treasury of other artworks whose uncanny appeal has fascinated and frightened, capturing a sense of otherness, wonder, and disquiet. … Read More

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