punk

‘Punk’ Magazine’s Iconic Covers That Captured the Rise of the ’70s NYC Scene

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Artist John Holmstrom, publisher Ged Dunn, and journalist Legs McNeil started Punk magazine in 1976 as former high school friends looking for scene cred and free drinks. The cartoons meets rock fanzine captured the flavor of New York City’s Lower East Side and its thriving underground art and music world. Forty years later, gallery and performance space Howl! Happening is looking back at Punk’s colorful history with an exhibition commemorating the magazine’s first issue, featuring Loud Reed on the cover (drawn by Holmstrom). The show runs January 14 to January 30.
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Scenes From the Graphic Novel That Inspired the Film ‘We Are the Best!’

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Many, many people have seen and loved Lukas Moodysson’s wonderful 2013 film, We Are the Best!, but I would venture to guess that few of these fans are aware that the filmmaker adapted his movie from a graphic novel written by his wife, Coco Moodysson. For those of you who have seen the film, the stories and characters of Never Goodnight will be instantly recognizable. The rest of you get the chance to meet Coco, Klara, and Matilda for the first time in English. Here, from the book, are four scenes to get you started.
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Rage Against the “Television Coma”: Algiers Soundtrack the Postcolonial Struggle

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When you listen to Algiers’ self-titled debut, it’s easy to hear the sources of the band’s sound: The somber soul and call-and-response of gospel hymns, the gritty textures of noise, the brashness of punk… even the relentless rhythms of industrial. At times, the record is smooth and soulful, at others, driving and forceful. But it’s the lyrics that are the most confrontational, especially on record.
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“It’s All About Shocking People”: Penelope Spheeris on Her Iconic Film ‘The Decline of Western Civilization’ and Punk in 2015

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“It’s my life’s work, here. I don’t want to fuck it up,” director Penelope Spheeris tells me by phone about Shout Factory’s Decline of Western Civilization Collection, released on June 30. We’re joined by her daughter Anna Fox, who helped produce the deluxe box set, which includes all three Decline documentaries restored in high-definition. But the retouched celluloid can’t destroy the grit and grime that clings to Spheeris’ curious lens as it chronicles some of punk’s most legendary bands in the first film (which screens in New York City on June 19 at BAMcinemaFest with the director in attendance): Black Flag, Fear, X, the Germs, and the Circle Jerks, to name a few. Throughout the trilogy, Spheeris is granted access to ratty clubs and gutter haunts, an outsider looking in. But the filmmaker knows what it’s like on the other side, having spent her formative years in a traveling carnival where her parents worked — strangers in strange lands. We discussed living on the fringe; the filmmaker’s 1983 film about teenage runaways, Suburbia; and the meaning of family.
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Flavorwire Premiere: Purple’s “Beach Buddy” Is Your Perfect Punk Summer Jam

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Party punks with a feminist streak, Purple proudly hail from east Texas — Beaumont, an oil town, to be exact. But you wouldn’t know it based on “Beach Buddy,” one of the highlights off 409, their recently released debut album. The infectious summer anthem, which sounds like The Strokes if they pulled a Ramones and hit up Rockaway Beach, finds drummer and primary vocalist Hanna Brewer trading sweet and sour harmonies with guitarist Taylor Busby over their sandy philandering.
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Beautiful Paintings That Explore the Paradox of Recapturing Punk

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There’s no dearth of imagery documenting the rise of punk in the ’70s and its commercial peak in the ’80s. Look in any Hot Topic and you’ll be reminded of just how abundant but thoroughly vacated the aesthetic has become, and how the very “man” it critiqued ended up turning politicized DIY into an overpriced instant-identity that pairs best with Dippin’ Dots. Yet Kelsey Henderson’s paintings (spotted on Booooooom) depicting punk’s aesthetics — head-shaving, spikily bejewling, a rejection of formalism and virtuosity — seem wholly fresh. They draw attention to the paradoxes of painting the punk scene, noting both a painting “problem” and a punk “problem” — and paying tender homage to both through the illogic of it.
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‘Salad Days’ Is the Documentary That Will Make the Mainstream Understand DC Hardcore

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If there was ever a testament to punk as an evolving document, forever building on its past, it was the Washington, DC hardcore scene and the growing pains its experienced in the mid-’80s. Nothing makes that more clear than Scott Crawford and Jim Saah’s exhaustive new documentary Salad Days, which premiered late last year in DC and makes its New York premiere this week at the IFC Center. Though Crawford’s personal history with DC punk began when he was the preteen writer of MetroZine, his documentary is more for the hardcore novice — the person who recognizes the significance of the DC hardcore scene but couldn’t name more than a few Dischord bands.
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How to Celebrate Riot Grrrl Day: A Primer

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Yesterday, Boston mayor Marty Walsh declared that today (April 9) would be Riot Grrrl Day throughout the city, in honor of feminist punk icon Kathleen Hanna (Bikini Kill, Le Tigre, The Julie Ruin). A proclamation signed by Walsh reads, in part: “The Riot Grrrl philosophy has never felt more relevant, with misogyny still rampant in many cultural spaces… Riot Grrrls redefine the language used against them and continue to fight the newest incarnations of patriarchy. In doing so, they ironically confirm one ex-congressman’s accidental wisdom: ‘the female body has ways to try to shut that down.’ It sure does: women’s voices telling their stories can shut that down.”
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