Richard Linklater

20 Mind-Bending Movies Guaranteed to Make You Feel Stupid

In 1991, following his brilliant The Thin Blue Line, director Errol Morris attempted something even harder than getting an innocent man off Death Row: making Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History of Time into an accessible, audience-friendly, major motion picture. The resulting film is, at long last, available on DVD and Blu-ray via Criterion. It’s awfully good — though its in-depth discussions of quantum mechanics and black holes and the Big Bang are bound to make those of us who nodded off in science class feel a bit out of our element. Then again, some movies, with their convoluted storylines or surrealistic imagery or intellectual subject matter, have the unintended side effect of merely spotlighting our intellectual shortcomings. Here are a few others that made us feel just a little… Read More

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Sundance 2014: How Richard Linklater Spent 12 Years Chronicling ‘Boyhood’

PARK CITY, UTAH: Early in Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, Mason’s mom (Patricia Arquette) asks him to paint the doorframe. They’re moving out of their apartment — the first of several relocations over the film’s dozen-year narrative — and painting everything back to white. On the frame, Mason finds those little marks charting his and his sister’s growth, how tall they were at which age. More than any other contemporary filmmaker, Linklater understands cinema’s inherent value as the keeper of those little marks. The story of Boyhood‘s 12-year production (“We started this film 4,208 days ago,” Linklater joked at yesterday’s Sundance screening) is so fascinating that it threatens to overpower the narrative — since the former is so ambitious, the latter so slight. But this is a moving and powerful film, one that is all but without precedent. … Read More

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10 Sundance 2014 Movies We Can’t Wait to See

Last night, the 36th annual Sundance Film Festival kicked off in Park City, Utah, a small resort town taken over, for a week and a half each year, by a gaggle of stars, independent filmmakers, moviegoers, and press. But it wasn’t always such a big deal; it was originally dubbed the Utah/US Film Festival and held in early fall, only moving to mid-winter in 1981 so that the nearby slopes would draw otherwise uninterested Hollywood types. (I like to remind myself of this little story while trudging through the snow and cold there.) For the third year in a row, your Flavorwire is on the ground in Utah, soaking up some of the year’s most promising independent films. Here are a few of our most anticipated titles: … Read More

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10 Things You Didn’t Know About ‘Dazed and Confused’

Today marks the 20th anniversary of Richard Linklater’s Dazed and Confused, the first great teen comedy-drama from the 1990s that happened to take place on the last day of school in 1976. Full of bongs, bell bottoms, and beer busts, the film was a lovely, nostalgic look at teenage life at the mark of America’s bicentennial. Compared to American Graffiti, Dazed and Confused launched the careers of numerous recognizable names: Ben Affleck, Parker Posey, Milla Jovovich, Adam Goldberg, and Matthew McConaughey. Here are some fun facts about the film that you may not have already known. … Read More

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The 25 Essential American Indie Films, 1988-2013

As summer movie season grinds on, one dumbed-down big-budget summer bomb following the next, it’s tempting to give up on cinema altogether (at least until fall — and the “prestige pictures” — arrive). But there are options. Go see an indie! Watch something new and good! Or better yet, catch up on some indie movie history. In the spirit of our year-by-year suggestions for must-read books and must-own albums, we’ve assembled a rundown of the essential American independent films from the past 25 years — by no means a definitive list, but a starting… Read More

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50 Great Movies You Can (Legally) Watch for Free Right Now

Every week, this site does its best to point you in the direction of movies worth your time that are streaming on Netflix, Hulu Plus, and the like. But what about those who aren’t ponying up the ten or 20 bucks a month for those services? Well, there’s an overabundance of free movies streaming at this very moment as well — many of them legally (it seems!), thanks our old friend “the public domain,” whereby films whose copyright has lapsed (or never existed in the first place) can be made available for public consumption. Others are hosted gratis by services that simply want to share the wealth of great cinema. Whatever the case, with an awareness of how much everyone loves free stuff, here are 50 free movies that are well worth a… Read More

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The True Stories Behind 10 Directors’ Most Personal Films

Many people believe that all art is shaped by our personal experiences. In the case of these ten directors, that certainly seems true. After reading a heartbreaking story shared by Richard Linklater, which became the inspiration for his 1995 film Before Sunrise, we went searching for more true stories behind directors’ most personal films. Some created their movies as a way to cope with the struggles of their past and document an experience, while others used the platform to ponder their future. The stories provide a snapshot of the private lives and creative minds of some of cinema’s greatest… Read More

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10 Famous Filmmakers on Their Favorite Overlooked Movies

It’s always fun to find out what movies inspire our favorite filmmakers, particularly when the Scorseses and Wes Andersons and the like point us away from the traditional canon and towards movies that are a little more obscure and unsung. In that spirit, the new book The Best Film You’ve Never Seen finds writer Robert K. Elder talking to 35 directors about their favorite overlooked, lost, or critically savaged films. Here’s a brief peek at what Flavorwire favorites like John Waters, Edgar Wright, Guillermo del Toro, and Richard Linklater recommended. … Read More

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