Richard Pryor

Tracy Morgan to Play the Wonderfully Crude Redd Foxx in Richard Pryor Biopic

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Tracy Morgan’s comeback following his accident is real, and seems momentous. After having hosted SNL, he’s set to appear in the Ice Cube/Christina Hendricks/Dean Norris-starring comedy, Fist Fightand now, according to The Hollywood Reporterhe’s in talks to play the iconically crude standup comedian Redd Foxx — most known for starring in Sanford and Son — in Lee Daniels’ Richard Pryor biopic.
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Book Excerpt: The Groundbreaking Transformation of Richard Pryor

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Tomorrow, your film editor’s third book, Richard Pryor: American Id, hits shelves (a book, by the way, borne out of a post on this very website). What follows, rather than the customary book excerpt, is an “outtake” — a bit from the book, cut due to length, detailing Pryor’s transition from a vanilla mainstream comedian into the fierce voice of ‘70s black consciousness that America came to know, love, and fear.
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The 6 Best Movies to Buy or Stream This Week: ‘Results,’ ‘Moonrise Kingdom’

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Only one new movie makes the grade for this week’s new release recommendations, which is part of what’s great about Blu-ray — the opportunity to revisit, reevaluate, and reappraise. So this week, take a look at a rare Richard Pryor drama, an iconic Al Pacino performance, an influential exploitation movie, a powerful Australian drama, and one of Wes Anderson’s very best films.
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“It’s All About Shocking People”: Penelope Spheeris on Her Iconic Film ‘The Decline of Western Civilization’ and Punk in 2015

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“It’s my life’s work, here. I don’t want to fuck it up,” director Penelope Spheeris tells me by phone about Shout Factory’s Decline of Western Civilization Collection, released on June 30. We’re joined by her daughter Anna Fox, who helped produce the deluxe box set, which includes all three Decline documentaries restored in high-definition. But the retouched celluloid can’t destroy the grit and grime that clings to Spheeris’ curious lens as it chronicles some of punk’s most legendary bands in the first film (which screens in New York City on June 19 at BAMcinemaFest with the director in attendance): Black Flag, Fear, X, the Germs, and the Circle Jerks, to name a few. Throughout the trilogy, Spheeris is granted access to ratty clubs and gutter haunts, an outsider looking in. But the filmmaker knows what it’s like on the other side, having spent her formative years in a traveling carnival where her parents worked — strangers in strange lands. We discussed living on the fringe; the filmmaker’s 1983 film about teenage runaways, Suburbia; and the meaning of family.
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How 10 of the Best Stand-Up Comedians Handle Hecklers

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If we learned anything about stand-up comedy last fall, it’s that when a Hannibal Buress video goes viral, you should probably watch it. This time, his YouTube hit isn’t going to end an icon’s career; it’s just an enormously entertaining three-minute destruction of a boorish heckler. Said hecklers have been the bane of many a comedian’s existence — drunken assholes, bachelorette party morons, and would-be comics have been mistaking stand-up for interactivity since the form began. So on this April Fools’ Day, we thought we’d take a look at how Buress and a few other comic greats handled these particular fools.
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Staff Picks: Flavorwire’s Favorite Cultural Things This Week

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Need a great book to read, album to listen to, or TV show to get hooked on? The Flavorwire team is here to help: in this weekly feature, our editorial staffers recommend the cultural object or experience they’ve enjoyed most in the past seven days. Click through for our picks, and tell us what you’ve been loving in the comments.
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A Brief History of Hollywood Being Totally Terrified of Computers

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“Our world interconnected. Our systems interconnected. Our identities vulnerable.” So goes the on-screen tagline in the trailer for Michael Mann’s new cyber-thriller Blackhat, and as the word “identities” is replaced by “security,” “homes,” “secrets,” “money,” “privacy,” “safety,” and the like — along with a giant close-up of a cable plugging in — it’s easy to chuckle along with Hollywood doing one more fear-mongering thriller about hackers taking down sacred cows and exposing private information, as if such a thing were actually plausible. (Oh, wait.) Yes, the Sony hack suddenly made Blackhat’s potentially worrisome January release suddenly timely and relevant, but it’s part of a long tradition of films that looked at the capabilities of computers, artificial intelligence, and the Internet — and shit their collective pants over it.
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