Roger Ebert

25 Delightful Roger Ebert Quotes About Movies

The documentary Life Itself, a poignant tribute that celebrates Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic Roger Ebert, was released in theaters this weekend. Generations grew up reading the Chicago Sun-Times journalist and watching him on television with sparring partner Gene Siskel, where the duo coined their “two thumbs up” phrase for positive reviews in the series At the Movies. Ebert’s barbed wit, grace, and passion touched the most discerning cineastes, but he was also known as a critic for the common man. He battled cancer for more than a decade, which necessitated the removal of his lower jaw, but it never stole his ability to write — which he did until his death last year. Two days before his passing, Ebert announced he was taking a “leave of presence” on RogerEbert.com. “What in the world is a leave of presence? It means I am not going away,” he wrote. And he hasn’t, leaving us with his beautiful words and wisdom about cinema and beyond. In celebration of the release of Life Itself, we’re revisiting some of Ebert’s most delightful quotes about one of his greatest loves — film. … Read More

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“I Give It Two Thumbs Up”: Chaz Ebert on ‘Life Itself’ and Her Husband, Roger Ebert

If you are a fan of the movies, if Siskel and Ebert’s At the Movies meant anything to you, if some sly wording by the late Roger Ebert in a column from his 46 years as The Chicago Sun-Times‘ film critic convinced you to see the film that changed your life, you should probably go see Life Itself, the new documentary about America’s film critic, in the theater. As his widow, Chaz Ebert, tells me over the phone, “I think it’s so poetic that a man like Roger, who spent his whole life reviewing movies, ends up ending his life on the big screen.” … Read More

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Flavorwire’s Guide to Indie Flicks to See in July

Last weekend, Transformers: Age of Extinction — Michael Bay’s latest, nearly-three-hour love letter to shit blowing up, orange women in short shorts, and editorial incoherence — grossed $300 million worldwide. In one weekend. If that information, and what it means for the ongoing dumbing-down and sequel-ization of mainstream moviemaking, isn’t enough to get you to the art house this month out of sheer principle, here are a few indie movies worth making the trek for as well. … Read More

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12 Abandoned Movies by Famous Screenwriters

Hollywood, this is why you can’t have nice things. A couple of weeks back, word broke that Quentin Tarantino had finished a new screenplay called The Hateful Eight, described as a Western with plum roles for recent Best Actor nominee (and Django Unchained bit player) Bruce Dern and Tarantino fave Christoph Waltz, and there was much rejoicing. That celebration ended earlier this week, when Tarantino discovered that the script had been leaked and pulled the plug on the entire project. But his unproduced script is in good company; here are a few other famous abandoned screenplays we’d love to have… Read More

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Sundance 2014: ‘Life Itself’ Is a Warm Tribute to Film, Criticism, and the Incomparable Roger Ebert

PARK CITY, UTAH: Roger Ebert was the first one to tell us that film criticism does not exist in a vacuum — that critics carry their personal experiences into the theater with them, and that not only should they not ignore those experiences, but they should use them. Yet for that reason, readers may be hard-pressed to find reviews of Life Itself, the new bio-documentary portrait of Mr. Ebert that premiered at Sundance this weekend, that are solely about the film. For many of us, Roger Ebert is the reason we write about films, his television work and books and online reviews inspiring us to be the kind of people who, well, would like to trudge through Utah for a week in January to see movies and write about them. No film in the festival is as critic-friendly; watching it, I finally understood how football players must feel about Brian’s Song. … Read More

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10 Sundance 2014 Movies We Can’t Wait to See

Last night, the 36th annual Sundance Film Festival kicked off in Park City, Utah, a small resort town taken over, for a week and a half each year, by a gaggle of stars, independent filmmakers, moviegoers, and press. But it wasn’t always such a big deal; it was originally dubbed the Utah/US Film Festival and held in early fall, only moving to mid-winter in 1981 so that the nearby slopes would draw otherwise uninterested Hollywood types. (I like to remind myself of this little story while trudging through the snow and cold there.) For the third year in a row, your Flavorwire is on the ground in Utah, soaking up some of the year’s most promising independent films. Here are a few of our most anticipated titles: … Read More

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Now That Publicists Control Interviews, Let’s Thank Twitter for Revealing Which Celebrities Are Secretly Terrible

Back in 1970, Esquire ran a remarkable Lee Marvin interview, conducted by Roger Ebert. Actually, “conducted” is a bit of a strong word; as was his style in those days, he merely sat back and observed, the piece less a Q&A and more a series of impressions of the man. Marvin, who was drunk when the session began, spends the afternoon drinking more beer, listening to records, groping his girlfriend, joking about his infidelities, and talking shit. It’s a great interview — and the kind of thing you can’t imagine any star doing today. “These days the publicists only want to present the soundbite opportunity,” Ebert said of the piece years later, and he was right. We seldom get the chance to observe actors being, it seems, anything close to their actual selves. Except on Twitter. And that brings us to Jason Biggs, who (in this and many other ways) is no Lee Marvin. … Read More

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There’s Going to Be a Movie About the Making of ‘Beyond the Valley of the Dolls’

Great news for movie buffs: the making of camp masterpiece Beyond the Valley of the Dolls will be the subject… Read More

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10 of the Most Fascinating ‘Playboy’ Interviews

Playboy magazine is known for its sexy centerfolds and covers, but the gentleman’s glossy has a long history of publishing short stories and interviews with notable personalities. The eternal joke that people read Playboy for the articles is really true. The magazine’s archive reveals a collection of deeply personal and insightful conversations with filmmakers, musicians, and other cultural figures. We’ve highlighted ten that share profound and fascinating moments from pop culture and American history. … Read More

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