Shia LaBeouf

10 Candidates to Play Han Solo in the Upcoming ‘Star Wars’ Prequel

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It’s official: the new era of Star Wars inaugurated by The Force Awakens, kicking off the hype cycle for the next movie this December, will also include an origin story for Han Solo, Ground Zero for every bad-boy complex from the late ’70s onward. More likely than not, Han 2.0 will be played by a complete unknown, like his (or her!) predecessor. Still, here are ten actors we’d love to see following in Harrison Ford’s footsteps.
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“It’s Why People Don’t Pick Their Nose on CNN”: Words of Wisdom From Shia LaBeouf, Producer

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I would’ve been at the Tribeca Film Festival work-in-progress preview for the new Alma Har’el movie LoveTrue no matter what. I saw her last film, Bombay Beach, at Tribeca back in 2011 and it knocked me out; whatever she’s doing next, I’m in. But that’s not why there was a throng of photographers on the red carpet. It’s because Shia LaBeouf was there.
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In Praise of Kanye West, James Franco, and Other High-Art Multi-Hyphenates

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Earlier this year, famed rapper, producer, and headline subject Kanye West put out a fashion line through Adidas, called Yeezy Season 1. It was not the prettiest thing in the world, and, though he made grand proclamations about his intention to have these items priced fairly, at $450 for a sweatshirt, it is not affordable to most human beings, no matter how you shake it. To put it simply: the line was pretty much universally panned, and people told him to stop. But he shouldn’t stop. Neither should James Franco, Lena Dunham, Miranda July, Ethan Hawke, Shia LaBeouf, or any of their other multi-hyphenate friends. They should do whatever the hell they want — and, in fact, the more the merrier.
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David Fincher, ‘Strangers on a Train,’ and the Tricky Business of Remaking Hitchcock

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It’s a classic good news/bad news scenario: the good news is that director David Fincher, screenwriter Gillian Flynn, and star Ben Affleck are looking to reteam after the critical and popular success of last fall’s Gone Girl. The bad news? It’s for a remake (or, as Variety inexplicably dubs it, a reboot) of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1951 adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s Strangers on a Train. The news is getting a pretty mixed reception among film buffs, even Fincher diehards, and for good reason: remaking Hitch is not, traditionally, a feat wisely attempted or successfully accomplished.
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