Star Trek

Flavorwire Interview: George Takei on Japanese Internment, Hollywood’s Race Problem, and His Broadway Show ‘Allegiance’

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Based on true events, the Broadway musical Allegiance tells the story of the Kimura family, who, along with 120,000 other Japanese-Americans, are forced to leave their homes and become imprisoned in internment camps after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The show’s star, George Takei, was an internee as a child, and he based his performance on his own family’s stories, the stories of other Japanese-Americans, and the research he has conducted throughout his lifetime.
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Watch the Totally Zany Trailer for ‘Star Trek Beyond’

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Sci-fi fans, it’s time to celebrate: 2016’s most anticipated J.J. Abrams-related release is just around the corner, and there’s finally a trailer to prove it. Yes, that’s right, the Star Trek Beyond trailer is finally here, soundtracked by the Beastie Boys’ “Sabotage” and filled with enough kooky ensemble shenanigans to erase one’s memory of some other major “star” franchise Abrams is now primarily helming.
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Move Over, Black Widow: The Biggest Sluts in Action and Superhero History

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“But, Conan, if you slept with four of the six Avengers, no matter how much fun you had, you’d be a slut… I’d be a slut.” — Jeremy Renner to Conan O’Brien, May 2015.

Jeremy Renner is working hard to advance an equal-opportunity definition of the loaded term “slut.” He even thinks that he’d count as a slut if he fictionally slept with fictional characters. So to honor his valiant crusade, and prove that he wasn’t singling out Black Widow because of gender or objectification or anything mean like that, we’re taking a look at the biggest sluts in action movie history, regardless of gender.
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25 Quotes from ‘Star Trek’ Space Philosopher Captain Kirk

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There are two types of people in this world — those who love William Shatner as the “Priceline Negotiator,” and those who love him as space philosopher and Adonis Captain James Tiberius Kirk. We tend to side with the latter. No one pauses during a speech like old Jim, commanding his fleet with the wisdom of an ancient sage (when he wasn’t busy wooing space’s female population). Today is Shatner’s 84th birthday, so join us in remembering these philosophical musings from one of pop culture’s greatest characters.
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It’s Nobody’s Business Why William Shatner Missed Leonard Nimoy’s Funeral

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Leonard Nimoy’s death prompted an almost universally positive outpouring of remembrances in the media Friday, but the backlash against his Star Trek costar William Shatner sounded a more sour note. This weekend, Shatner came to social media to express his sorrow over the loss of his costar and friend, and lamented his inability to attend Nimoy’s funeral due to a charitable commitment in Florida. For this, he was rewarded with a “Captain Jerk” headline by the tabloids.
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Leonard Nimoy Has Died, But His Beloved ‘Star Trek’ Character Will Live Forever

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The first thing I said after the New York Times alert appeared on my phone this afternoon was, “Spock can’t be dead!” And in a way, that’s true. Spock isn’t dead; characters don’t die.

But I struggle, as he struggled, to separate the actor from the role. Leonard Nimoy, who died this morning at age 83, alternately embraced and shrugged off his connection to the iconic Star Fleet officer, from his 1967 record Leonard Nimoy Presents Mr. Spock’s Music From Outer Space (an album that bears no resemblance to anything the canonical Spock might have created, but which was certainly — and charmingly — from outer space) to his 1977 autobiography, I Am Not Spock, to his 1995 follow up, I Am Spock. He didn’t have the self-seriousness of his friend William Shatner, who felt Kirk hang like a millstone from his classically trained shoulders. Nimoy would never tell a Star Trek fan, even in jest, to “get a life.” I think he understood that this, the world he helped create, was a kind of life.
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Where Are All the New Sci-Fi Movie Franchises?

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Well, there’s going to be a new Alien movie, and for some reason, this is good news. Word broke yesterday that Neill Blomkamp, writer/director of District 9 and the forthcoming Chappie, closed a deal with 20th Century Fox to helm a new film in the sci-fi/monster franchise, and everyone is very excited, somehow ignoring the fact that Ridley Scott’s 1979 original has yielded exactly one good sequel (James Cameron’s Aliens) and no fewer than five more that are varying degrees of terrible (Alien 3, Alien: Resurrection, Alien vs. Predator, Alien vs. Predator: Requiem, and Scott’s own Prometheus). That’s a 16 percent sequel success rate, kids, so let’s maybe keep it in our pants for a minute — particularly as Variety is reporting that the Blomkamp Alien is “separate from Prometheus 2, which Fox is still making with Ridley Scott.” Oh, cool, so they’re making like a whole Alien Cinematic Universe, awesome idea, A-plus you guys. But here’s the more pressing issue: in this era of mega budgets and limitless effects possibilities, why has science fiction fallen so specifically prey to the endless sequel-remake-reboot machine? Where are the new sci-fi franchises?
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