The Beatles

You Know What The Beatles’ Arrival on Streaming Means: More Manufactured Intergenerational Squabbles!

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Who are the Beatles? Are they demisexual? Are they on Snapchat? Are they problematic? What does Pitchfork think? These are the rather absurd kinds of questions media types (and Spotify itself) have put in the mouths of young millennials as the Fab Four’s substantial back catalog arrives on music streaming services around the world, just in time for Christmas.
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Flavorwire Staffers on the Song Lyrics They Totally Didn’t Get as Kids

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Did you originally start listening to Eminem as a child because you were a glutton for chocolate, then only keep listening because you were also incidentally a glutton for punishment? Did you think “…Baby One More Time” was about a temperamental, flailing infant, that “Killing Me Softly” told the story of someone poisoned with Downy, or that “Smells Like Teen Spirit” was an ode to BO?
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Yoko Ono Is For Everyone

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In October 2000, right around what would have been John Lennon’s 60th birthday, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame opened one of its most extensive exhibits ever, in honor of Lennon’s life and (mostly non-Beatles) work. Amidst the expected artifacts — handwritten lyrics, grammar-school report cards, the white baby grand from the “Imagine” video — sat one that was horrifying: a bag from New York’s St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital containing the clothes Lennon was wearing on the night Mark David Chapman shot him outside the Dakota. Coupled with Lennon’s glasses, caked in 20-year-old blood, this corner of the exhibit was intended as an emotional climax. Even at 13 years old, the weight of these artifacts impressed upon me a jaded anger: How could someone have violently ripped Lennon from this world when all he wanted was to make it a peaceful place?
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How ‘Mad Men’ Used Music to Recontextualize ’60s Pop Culture

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For a TV show to be as instantly canonized as Mad Men has been throughout its seven-season run, nearly every aspect of it needs to serve a distinct purpose, to be thoughtful. For that TV show to be historical in nature, the details need to be meticulous. And for that TV show to be about the 1960s, one of the most controversial and turbulent decades in American cultural history, it needs to walk a very specific tightrope — one that carefully navigates the generational divide that defined the late ‘60s. Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner and music supervisor Alexandra Patsavas, one of the most influential players in the music-on-TV revolution of the early ‘00s, have achieved all of this — and with plenty of irreverence, humor, and hidden meaning to boot.
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