The Matrix

Imagining a World Without Work

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At the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893, someone asked American suffragette and political activist Mary Elizabeth Lease what she thought the world would be like in 100 years’ time. Lease had a bold answer: “By the end of the next century,” she predicted, “three hours will constitute a long day’s work. And this work will liberally furnish infinitely more of the benefits of civilization and the comforts of life than 16 hours’ slavish toil will today.” As we say here in the 21st century: LOL. Sadly, Lease’s prediction hasn’t exactly come true. But you can see why she made it: she imagined that in the 21st century, we’d have all these wonderful machines that make our lives easier! Instead, it’s one of the paradoxes of capitalism that while the amount of labor dedicated to keeping us alive is growing ever smaller, the amount of work we’re actually doing is growing ever larger.
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The Delicious Irony of MRAs’ Appropriation of ‘The Matrix’s’ Red Pill

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“This is your last chance. After this, there is no turning back. You take the blue pill — the story ends, you wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe. You take the red pill — you stay in Wonderland, and I show you how deep the rabbit hole goes. Remember: all I’m offering is the truth. Nothing more.”

As ridiculous as it may sound, there are grown men whose entire ideological worldview has been shaped by the above quote from the 1999 film The Matrix. These men are known by many names (“men’s rights activists,” “meninists,” “red-pillers,” “pick-up artists”), and while there doesn’t seem to be much in the way of nominal continuity, their core belief remains constant: men are being oppressed.
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The Seven-Month Delay on the Wachowskis’ ‘Jupiter Ascending’ Is a Blessing, Not a Curse

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Jupiter Ascending is the newest film from the Wachowskis, the sibling team responsible for the Matrix trilogy, a $150 million science-fiction/action epic starring Mila Kunis and Channing Tatum. Its July release date was staked out over a year in advance, with the publicity machine clicking right along on that timeline: first trailer last Christmas, second trailer at the beginning of the summer, posters in the multiplexes, magazines on the newsstands, etc. And so it came as a bit of a shock when, last night — after most of the sites covering the film had closed up shop for the day — distributor Warner Brothers quietly announced that they’re pushing the film off its July 18 release date to a new spot clear in February of 2015. And movie fans issued a collective Uh-oh.
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