Thomas Pynchon

50 Incredible Novels Under 200 Pages

Springtime can make even the most devoted of readers a little bit antsy. After all, there are flowers to smell, puddles to jump in, fresh love to kindle. You still want to have a novel in your pocket — just maybe one that doesn’t require quite so epic an attention span. Never fear: after the jump, you will find 50 incredible novels under 200 pages (editions vary, of course, so there’s a little leeway) that are suitable for this or any… Read More

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Flavorwire’s Most Anticipated Movies of 2014

Well, 2013 is over, and thank goodness for that. Sure, it was one of the best years in recent memory for movies, but the year-end box office returns indicate it was a year where people mostly wanted to sequels and remakes. And there are plenty of those on tap for 2014 — and a few of them even look promising! (A very few.) So in the spirit of looking forward, let’s have a glance at some of the films we’re most looking forward to in the new… Read More

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Literary Libations from Famous Books

It’s the dawn of a new year, and to celebrate we’re showing our appreciation for the booze in books that literature’s most famous sipped between pages. Fictional drinks and classic cocktails all make appearances with several being the catalyst for memorable narratives and others symbolizing intense character relationships. See what literary libations sparked drama, memories, and everything in between. … Read More

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Garth Risk Hallberg’s ‘City on Fire’: Why Writers Are Obsessed With New York’s Past

If you’re a New Yorker who gets your information from Matt Drudge — and I’m really sorry if that’s the case — then you’re already counting down the days until you’re forced to join the Baseball Furies, the Gramercy Riffs, the Turnbull AC’s, or if you’re really desperate, the Orphans. That’s because, according to Drudge, the Bill de Blasio era will signal nothing short of the end of democracy as we know it in the Big Apple. Warriors, come out to play… … Read More

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50 Incredibly Tough Books for Extreme Readers

Maybe it’s a Pavlovian response to years of schooling, or that the brisk weather affords more hours inside, or something else entirely, but the fact is this: November seems like the time to take on the heftiest reading on your list. And let’s face the facts: some books are only for the toughest readers on the block, your Sylvester Stallones of literature, as it were. So for those of you who count yourself tough, here’s a list of books for you: some absurdly long, some notoriously difficult, some with intense or upsetting subject matter but blindingly brilliant prose, some packed into formations that require extra effort or mind expansion, and some that fit into none of those categories, but are definitely for tough girls (or guys)… Read More

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13 of the Best Literary Quotes About Beer

Everybody knows that a beer and a good book go quite well together — including the authors of said books. Since it’s October, everyone’s favorite month for beer (books are good any month of the year), indulge in a few of literature’s greatest quotes about the frothy stuff — from grand pronouncements to so-detailed-you-can-taste-it descriptions of the perfect… Read More

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50 Books to Inspire Artists of All Kinds

Today marks the release of one of the most long-awaited novels in recent memory: Donna Tartt’s third novel, the glorious, sprawling, Dickens-esque romp The Goldfinch. The book is backboned by its eponymous painting, and much concerned with art of all kinds, so to celebrate its release, and to suggest a little artistic inspiration for those who’ve already read it (or will have in about three days), we’ve put together a list of 50 books for artists: to inspire, to entertain, to shake up the system. Some of these books are about visual art, some are visual art in themselves, some just strike us as the kind of thing that might keep an artist up at… Read More

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2013 National Book Awards: Flavorwire’s Guide to This Year’s Finalists

On MSNBC’s Morning Joe today, David Steinberger, the Board of Directors Chairman of the National Book Awards, announced the finalists for the coveted award in Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, and Young People’s Literature. The fewest surprises appear in the fiction category, with Rachel Kushner and George Saunders looking like the popular favorites and 2000 Pulitzer Prize winner Jhumpa Lahiri mounting some stiff competition (even though I wasn’t totally sold on The Lowland). … Read More

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In Praise of Leonard Cohen, Great Novelist

“It is kind of an intelligent Naked Lunch,” was how one Dallas Times Herald writer described Leonard Cohen’s 1966 novel Beautiful Losers, an interesting and somewhat auspicious comparison when you consider how controversial Burroughs’ book — published less than a decade earlier in 1959 — was. According to critic Robert Fulford, Cohen wrote what he considered “the most revolting book ever written in Canada,” a criticism that certainly didn’t help the book’s poor sales. Cohen was a celebrated poet in his home country of Canada, but was living off his inheritance on a Greek island in the Saronic Gulf upon the book’s release. … Read More

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