Tina Fey

How ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’ Is Subverting the Gay Best Friend Stereotype

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The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt‘s Titus Andromedon, as he so often notes, is gay, femme, black, and bald. He’s also worried about aging. This series of qualities marginalize him, leading to difficulties in his ever-burgeoning musical theater career and inspiring him to realize, “I’m not even gonna know what box to check on the hate crime form.” They also lead him to be incredibly strong. Most importantly — unlike most gay best friend characters on TV — he’s one of the show’s two …Read More

50 Great Books About 50 Inspiring Women

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There’s never a bad time to read about historically badass ladies, but since March is Women’s History Month, now is a particularly perfect moment to bust out your library card and take in some stories of women who’ve changed art, culture, and history as we know it. Here you’ll find 50 great biographies and autobiographies of famous, fascinating, and inspiring women, from Frida Kahlo to Mina Loy to Marie …Read More

Tina Fey’s ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’ Has All the Promise (and Some of the Problems) of Early ’30 Rock’

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Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt is the new show from 30 Rock team Tina Fey and Robert Carlock, and its first season appeared today on Netflix. The show sets up its concept in a tight two minutes: Kimmy (Ellie Kemper, best known for The Office and her supporting role in Bridesmaids) was abducted at 14. She has spent the past 15 years of her life in an apocalypse bunker.
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Fey, Poehler, Maron, and Apatow Begin Stand-Up’s Overdue Reckoning With Bill Cosby’s Comedy Legacy

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Last week, I was reading (and enjoying) Patton Oswalt’s new book Silver Screen Fiend, a memoir of his four-year film addiction, which occurred as he was simultaneously finding his footing as a comedian. In describing the latter progression, he writes: “I’d spent the first nineteen years of life memorizing every comedy album I could play on my parents’ turntable. I knew the exact timing for the pause between the words ‘waited’ and ‘July’ in Bill Cosby’s ‘Revenge’ routine.” That line, the first of several examples of his comedy obsession, jumps out and jars — due, of course, to timing beyond Oswalt’s control. The book was presumably put to bed long before the accusations of Cosby’s decades as a serial rapist resurfaced last fall; the line serves as a reminder not just of his vaunted position in the comedy community, but of how slow that community has been to react to the accusations. This week, the tide began to turn, first with Tina Fey and Amy Poehler’s jaw-dropping Cosby jokes in their Golden Globes introduction, then with a candid conversation the next day between Judd Apatow and Marc Maron on Maron’s WTF podcast.
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