Tracey Emin

24 Powerful Works by Contemporary Women Artists You Should Know

Like other realms of the culture, the visual arts are, at the moment, a male-dominated profession. A recent book put together by arts scholars, entitled The Reckoning: Women Artists of the New Millennium, records the same kind of problem you often hear women writers complaining about: in spite of the fact that MFA graduates are overwhelmingly women, it’s men who get the crucial solo exhibitions at galleries which can make or break an artist’s career. The Reckoning seeks to correct this by recognizing the work of 25 young female artists who are breaking new ground, these days. Here is a sampling of their… Read More

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From Collaboration to Theft: What Happens When Art and Advertising Collide

Last week, the Texas Department of Transportation ordered the removal of a new large-scale sculpture designed by contemporary artist Richard Phillips for Playboy Enterprises, on the grounds that Playboy had not solicited a permit for a public advertisement. Titled Playboy Marfa, the work sits along a stretch of US Highway 90 outside of Marfa, Texas, and is comprised of a 1972 Dodge Charger sitting on a plinth next to a giant neon rendering of the Playboy logo. … Read More

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The 10 Most Memorable Artist Collaborations

For her contribution to the Manchester International Festival, Tracey Emin has announced plans for a collaboration with Louise Bourgeois, who she describes as her “hero” in a recent Guardian op-ed. To get past the hurdle of Bourgeois no longer being alive, Emin will employ a close reading of Hans Ulrich Obrist’s 2004 tome Do It, in which 165 venerated artists provided instructions on how to reproduce their work. Even though the results will fit the definition of collaboration narrowly — a far cry from the genuine two-woman jobs that Hauser & Wirth exhibited in 2011 —  the idea of seeing both minds at work is intriguing, and, given the tone of Emin’s op-ed, pretty damn poignant. … Read More

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Flavorpill Guide to This Week’s Top 10 New York Events

For our (unconscionably high) rent money, the best thing about living in NYC is its endless supply of fun, odd, and inspired cultural events. But with so many options, it can be hard to know where to even begin planning your week. To help you make sense of it all, Flavorpill Deputy Editor Mindy Bond shares the very best of what’s on offer this week. It’s just a taste of what you can find on the new Flavorpill, so if you like what you see, be sure to sign up… Read More

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Extremely Silly Photos of Famous People Playing Air Guitar

There are certain photos guaranteed to make us giggle no matter how shitty we’re feeling, and one such image is the picture of Marcel Proust playing air guitar that resurfaced on the Atlantic this morning. Clearly, the appeal of air guitar is universal, and even those of us who aren’t famous musicians (or, y’know, famous air guitarists), can appreciate the appeal of soloing like crazy on a tennis racket, broomstick or nothing at all. In the spirit of such inclusiveness, then, here’s a light-hearted round-up of other famous people who’ve joined Proust in succumbing to the lure of the air guitar – starting with the great French writer himself. … Read More

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Amazing Chess Sets Created by Famous Artists

Who needs regular chess when you can play with Yayoi Kusama’s splendidly dotted mushroomy shapes, Damien Hirst’s glass crystal pharmacy sets, or major chess champ Garry Kasparov’s favorite, Paul McCarthy’s playable collection of random kitchen ephemera? Ketchup to F3 and toaster-mate! Want! That is, if we had the money to purchase famous art. On now at the Saatchi Gallery in London through October 3rd, The Art of Chess brings together the work of some of the biggest names in the art world and their version of one of the humanity’s oldest games. Luckily for us, the fantastic Happy Famous Artists blog team stopped by the exhibit. Check out their photos, check check. Get it?  … Read More

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10 Famous Artists Who Should Have Their Own Reality TV Show

“For the past three years I’ve been an intern at Eli Klein Fine Art,” says one of the characters on Bravo’s Gallery Girls by way of introduction. This should give you a good idea of what the reality series, which premieres Monday at 10 pm, entails: a handful of pretty young women trying to make their way in the New York art world despite multiple indications that it may not be the best path for them. Pitting the blonde Upper East Siders with fabulously wealthy parents and apparently permanent internships against Brooklyn brunettes on the verge of opening their own gallery/boutique (also with the help of family money), its relationship to art is roughly the same as The Hills’ was to journalism.

In other words, if you like to watch rich girls pick fights with each other and call their dads while soaking in a bubble bath (really), Gallery Girls is for you. But its lack of actual art world relevance got us thinking about what kinds of art-related reality shows we’d rather see — along with Bravo’s fun competition series, Work of Art, of course. It occurred to us that there is no shortage of fascinating, entertaining, and controversial personalities in contemporary art, so we hope you’ll excuse us for mixing the highbrow with the low in this list of famous artists who would make great reality stars. … Read More

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What It’s Like to Paint Spots for Damien Hirst

As we’ve discussed in this space before, just because someone is famous for a particular artwork doesn’t mean that they actually made the piece in question. While outsourcing the process can be part of the art’s conceit, more often than not it seems to be about making money with minimal effort. To wit, The Guardian has a fascinating roundup of first accounts from the people behind some of Britain’s best known art, including a painter of Damien Hirst’s infamous spots. … Read More

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Photos of Famous Artists When They Were Young

After running features on the childhood photos of both famous writers and rock stars over the past few weeks, it might seem like we’re a bit youth-obsessed at Flavorwire lately. But we promise that that’s not the case. We just think that there’s something fascinating about images of cultural icons snapped long before they’d become household names. It humanizes them a bit. And so, today we turn our focus on the art world — specifically, some of the most influential talents of the past 100 years. Click through to peep photos of everyone from a dashing young Andy Warhol (pictured here) to a breathtakingly adorable baby Yoko Ono. … Read More

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Who Will Be the Boy Bands of Tommy Mottola's Art Empire?

The rise and fall of the mass-produced hit — be it movie, song, or movie star — is a phenomenon unique to the last century. Nowhere has this cycle been more palpable over the past two decades than in the music industry, which, as detailed by Chris Anderson, editor-in-chief of Wired, in his book The Long Tail, “perfected the process of manufacturing blockbusters. The resounding commercial success of teen pop — from Britney Spears to the Backstreet Boys — showed that the business had its finger firmly on the pulse of American youth culture … their marketing departments could now predict and create demand with scientific precision.”

Then came the burst of dot-com bubble, rise of Napster, and peer-to-peer file trading networks. The fool-proof plan for creating a music mega-star began to splinter. Music moguls poured millions into lawsuits but the tide of music culture had long since turned, leaving executives disillusioned and bitter with the industry they knew so well. One by one they paid their respects (however vehemently) and either adapted or deserted.

Last week, Tommy Mottola, former head of Sony Music Entertainment who signed and developed artists like Mariah Carey, Celine Dion, Destiny’s Child, Jennifer Lopez, Shakira, the Dixie Chicks, and Mark Anthony, announced he had officially set his sights on a new industry: art. Over the fourth of July holiday, he opened a gallery in East Hampton that boasted of a hodgepodge of blue-chip works by artists like Warhol, Picasso, de Kooning, Alex Katz, Leger, and Rauschenberg. Mottola told the Wall Street Journal that “there’s never been a serious gallery out here in the Hamptons … I thought, with my knowledge and experience, I’d like to try my hand at it.” … Read More

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