Twitter

Inside the Weird World of Twitter’s Celebrity-Impersonating “Parody” Accounts

At 4:50 on the afternoon of March 1, @BillMurray tweeted a joke to his 497,000 Twitter followers: “I always say ‘morning’ instead of ‘good morning.’ If it were a good morning I’d still be in bed instead of talking to people.” His fans responded enthusiastically. “I knew we’d have something in common,” replied one follower; “Thanks for the laughs this am,” replied another. A third took the opportunity for a personal connection: “I watched Meatballs today for the first time in roughly 30 years. It was a good morning with some good memories.” In all, the joke was re-tweeted 1,243 times, and 1,587 Twitter users favorited it.

There’s only one problem: the person tweeting as @BiIIMurray isn’t really Bill Murray. As those with even a passing knowledge of the comedian and actor’s personality could guess, Bill Murray isn’t on Twitter. But “Bill Murray” is. … Read More

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Shonda Rhimes Tweets “HELL NO” in Response to Deadline’s “Ethnic Castings” Article

Deadline managed to trend on Twitter for several hours yesterday after running an article which insinuated that this season’s… Read More

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Beyond Mansplaining: A New Lexicon of Misogynist Trolling Behaviors

Mansplaining (verb, gerund) describes the phenomenon of someone (usually a man, but not always) behaving as though he has superior knowledge to someone else (often a woman) who actually knows more about the topic in question than he does. … Read More

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The Age of Perplexingly Warm Winters and Starbucks Delivery: Links You Need to See

#BeforeTwitter is trending on Twitter right now, and I’m having flashbacks to the days when computers were solely used for playing Duke Nukem. Is that going too far back through the sands of time? #AfterTwitter, we have what rapper A$AP Ferg calls the “culture of the Internet,” and in the same conversation he adds, “There’s no racism with the Internet. Racism only was—is probably like five generations ago.” #AfterTwitter, Ferg can probably see the Internet backlash forming on the horizon like an ungodly tsunami and should both immediately call his PR agent and order Jon Ronson’s book. … Read More

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Ashley Judd Intends to Press Charges Against Misogynist Trolls Who Threatened Her on Twitter

Actor, YouthAIDS ambassador and political activist Ashley Judd went to a basketball game between Kentucky and Arkansas teams this weekend… Read More

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You Can Become Azealia Banks, Sort of, Through Her New Interactive “Wallace” Music Video


Azealia Banks’ Twitter feuds are legendary: the rapper has thrown shade at everyone from Perez Hilton to… Read More

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10 Must-Read Books For March

March means only one thing: the frozen sea inside the heart of publishing is thawing. We will see books — first a trickle, then a flood. This deluge is so enormous, in fact, that we’ve decided to collect some of it in a bucket that we will call “10 Must-Read Books for March 2015.” Inside this bucket you will find Kazuo Ishiguro’s long-awaited follow-up to Never Let Me Go, great nonfiction, a non-diary diary, the “greatest Mexican novelist,” and more. Let the anticipation wash over you. … Read More

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How I (Sort Of) Replaced Twitter With a Diary

Crusty intellectual types are fond of expressing disgust with what they see as social media’s corrosive effect on our culture of Letters. Recently, we heard about it from deposed New Republic sage Leon Wieseltier in a mostly maddeningly opaque New York Times Book Review cover essay about disruption. “As the frequency of expression grows, the force of expression diminishes: Digital expectations of alacrity and terseness confer the highest prestige upon the twittering cacophony of one-liners and promotional announcements,” he wrote. “It was always the case that all things must pass, but this is ridiculous.” (The latter sentence would fit fabulously in a tweet, I thought ashamedly.) … Read More

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How the Internet Turns Justine Saccos Into Hester Prynnes

While people abusing the Internet’s power of anonymity to be cruel, and terrorizing through comments sections and social media, isn’t what anyone would call news (see: Amanda Hess’ award-winning “Why Women Aren’t Safe on the Internet,” Gamergate, etc.), a pair of articles in this weekend’s New York Times survey the damage in a way that suggests the Internet is in dire need of a code of ethics. With just one tiny misstep — or even just a misunderstanding — any one of us could become Hester Prynne for 15 minutes. … Read More

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