Vanity Fair

chastain-ZD30

The 10 Most Ludicrous Lines from ‘Vanity Fair’s’ Controversial Jessica Chastain Piece

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Late last night, Deadline made some Internet waves by accusing Vanity Fair of pulling a post mildly critical of Jessica Chastain in deference to the Best Actress nominee. The post, which went live on January 25th (just before Oscar voting began), was taken down within 24 hours, and has since been scrubbed from their archives. Deadline’s Nikki Finke assumes a giant conspiracy (of course), but we’re intrigued by VF’s own explanation for the post’s removal: “We took it down because it ran counter to what a number of people at the magazine believed.” Having read the post — written by Deputy Editor Bruce Handy — in its entirety, we’re actually sort of buying that argument. It’s not that Handy’s piece (which Deadline reprints in full) is particularly rude or mean-spirited; it’s that it’s filled with ridiculous arguments and silly assumptions. Here are the ten worst lines.
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Open Thread: Movies or TV? Or Both? Or Neither?

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James Wolcott loses me in the first line of his much-discussed Variety Fair piece “Prime Time’s Graduation,” which is pretty impressive, as far as those things go. “After I fell out of love with movies,” he writes, and I’ve checked out already — even more so with the parenthetical that follows: “(new movies, that is — classic Hollywood I still adulate)”. Oh goody, he’s one of those, one of the overbearing boors who insists nothing worthwhile has come out of Hollywood since Jaws, or Ben-Hur, or (if you’re a real, Bogdanovich-style purist) since the takeover of the talkies. But no, it’s worse: Mr. Wolcott is one of these inexplicable “TV is better than movies” people, and because he’s writing for one of the few remaining major glossies (to-do: write my “movies are better than magazines” piece), we now have to have this whole cultural conversation about whether television has, in fact, “surpassed” the motion picture.
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Does Vanity Fair’s Hollywood Issue Have a Race Problem — Again?

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We have good news and bad news about Vanity Fair‘s 2011 Hollywood Issue. First, the positive: Unlike last year’s wildly controversial model, the new cover actually includes a more diverse group of actors. (Also, for some reason, VF decided to go with a co-ed bunch this time around.) It’s great to see Anthony Mackie, The Hurt Locker star who has a slew of movies lined up this year, get some recognition. And we can never, ever get enough of Rashida Jones. We’re also pretty thrilled the magazine dropped its “Young Hollywood” focus and stuck the legendary Robert Duvall in the mix, even if he does have to tend bar.

But there are still a few things we find unsettling about the cover. Read all about them — and see how last year’s compares to this year’s — after the jump.
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