Vinyl

DIY Record Covers, Zines, and Posters from the ‘70s Punk and Reggae Movement

The fine folks at Boo-Hooray and Milk Gallery have partnered for an exhibition of DIY record cover art in New York City. The focus of DIY OR DIE! is geared toward the ‘70s punk scene in the US, UK, and Australia, as well as the Jamaican Dub/Ska/Rocksteady movement. The original paste-ups of punk fanzines from the collections of John Ingham (the music journalist who first interviewed The Sex Pistols), Geoffrey Weiss (whose record collection would make a grown person weep), and Bruce Griffiths (of Aberrant Records fame) are also on display, along with hand-printed punk posters created between 1976 and 1983. As if this treasure trove weren’t enough, Milk will also feature original stencils from the Crass archive. As the gallery explains: “These stencils are the ground zero of recent urban wall art. They were hand cut and utilized to full effect for the détournement of advertising billboards on the London Underground. They were also the origin for the backs of tens of thousands of punker leather motorcycle jackets.” If handmade silkscreens, stencils, and angsty collages on 12 and 7-inch vinyl sleeves are your happy place, stop by the gallery through August 10 to check out DIY OR DIE!. Here’s a teaser — highlighting covers for The Residents, Sun Ra, and more — to whet your appetite. … Read More

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Spending Record Store Day With Jack White, the Holiday’s Living Embodiment

The black and yellow paint, the tin ceilings, the interior archway with a phonograph for a keystone, the taxidermied elephant head in the blue room and full-sized bongo stalking the kitchen, the offices lined up as seedy motel rooms above a factory floor bathed in barely-not-nauseating yellow light, the lab coats the engineers wear while they’re cutting, probably even the bidet that hangs bat-like from the ceiling of one bathroom stall… everything in Third Man Records’ Nashville headquarters was born in Jack White’s head. Established in 2001, Third Man has put out a seemingly endless stream of vinyl releases, from Americana and country acts to scuzz punks to comedians to Neil freaking Young since opening this high-profile Nashville hub in ’09. If you’re a music lover, it’s nothing short of Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory in here. … Read More

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Nostalgic Photos of Iconic Records and the Vintage Turntables That First Played Them

Using Rolling Stone‘s The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time as a resource, photographer Kai Schäfer has catalogued landmark records in music history and the vintage turntables that first played them in his World Records series. Photos of famous vinyl — including albums by Bowie, Elvis, and Joy Division — recall a time when collecting music was a tactile and perhaps more intimate experience. “It is also a private time machi­ne to the spectator: music as an impulse to remember bits and pieces of one’s personal history, a release of former thoughts and feelings. The soundtrack of your life,” the artist writes. Schäfer is celebrating his first solo exhibition at Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles, which runs until July 13. Visit the gallery’s website to find out how you can see over 100 photos of your favorite albums. Click through for a preview. … Read More

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Musicians Hanging Out in Records Stores

What’s the best thing to do when you’re not digging for vinyl? Look at photos of musicians digging for vinyl, of course. Voices of East Anglia featured a few great pictures of stars during the 1960s hanging out at record emporiums, and we wanted to add our own contribution to the collection. Click through to see your favorite musicians in the wild, with… Read More

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Modern Songs Redesigned as Retro Vinyl Singles

We’ve admired the work of Robert Penney (Penney Design) and his pixilated reimaginings of The Beatles’ Abbey Road before. His latest project recently caught our attention on Retronaut. The designer took modern singles — like Lady Gaga’s “Poker Face” and “What A Waster” from English band The Libertines — and gave them a retro makeover à la 1957 and 1965. The creases, LP impressions, and faded 7″ artwork add to the effect, and we wish there were about a dozen more of these to gawk at. Penney wins bonus points for creating a 1980s-era Thom Yorke and new The Eraser cover, which looks appropriately Bowie-riffic. … Read More

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A Photo Survey of Abandoned Record Shops

We recently explored a photo survey of video stores that have faded to black since the digital marketplace takeover, which got us thinking about other ephemeral media. Just a few weeks ago it was reported that Times Square record haven Colony Music — founded in 1948, and with an inventory of more than one million LPs — would be closing its doors. Colony is one of many large chain music stores and indie record shops that have called it quits since the rise of high def formats, web retailers, and the popularity of digital downloading. It’s a phenomenon that’s being explored in documentaries like Last Shop Standing — about the rise, fall, and rebirth of indie record shops in the UK — which hits DVD today. (The filmmakers are encouraging audiences to purchase the movie locally.)

If you grew up ritualistically hunting for vinyl or cassettes and relied on knowledgeable record store employees for recommendations à la High Fidelity, you’ve definitely been feeling the pangs of loss as these stores quickly collapse around us. Click through our gallery of abandoned record shops — including several landmark stores — to remember the fine art of crate digging and the passionate music communities that made them awesome. … Read More

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What’s On at Flavorpill: The Links That Made the Rounds In Our Office

Today at Flavorpill, we got the scoop on Mantyhose, which are exactly what you think they are. We found out why Chartbeat is an “addictive, sanity-ruining stats tool.” We said goodbye to Austin icon, Leslie. We watched last night’s Shins show. We saw an Eyptian prosthetic… Read More

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Sleevefaces Reenact Classic Album Covers

Sleeveface is a simple concept: grab your favorite album from your vinyl collection (preferably with the artist’s portrait on the cover), position yourself behind the LP so that your body lines up perfectly with the image, and snap a photo. The phenomenon became so popular that Welsh DJ Carl Morris and his collaborator John Rostron even published a collection of the best photos — Sleeveface: Be The Vinyl. They also host a website where you can submit your own sleeveface. There’s some debate about who actually created the first one, but some say it started with Huey Lewis and the News’ 1982 album Picture This, which boasted a Huey sleeveface. Click through to see who took on the Bee Gees, David Bowie, Amy Winehouse, and more. … Read More

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The Best of Bond: ‘Goldfinger’ on Vinyl

Now that Bond-23 has a villain in the form of ultra sinister Javier Bardem — a palpably menacing presence in the Coen brothers’ No Country For Old Men — we thought it seemed like a ripe time to look back at some of the best of Bond. The allure that exudes from the thrill-seeking British Secret Service agent with a penchant for gorgeous girls and vodka martinis is obvious, but his fiendish foe is always one of the most highly anticipated roles in each new installment. Another significant legacy of the series, however, is its music and unmistakable theme — sounds indelibly associated with the late maestro, John Barry.

The English composer’s work is synonymous with 007, and Goldfinger boasts one of the boldest and brassiest title numbers in the superspy’s songbook. Shirley Bassey performed the theme tune, which topped the Billboard charts during its heyday. One of the box office hits of 1964, the movie’s most iconic and recognizable image is Shirley Eaton’s sultry character, Jill Masterson, covered head-to-toe in gold paint and cast on a bed in morbid repose. The popularity of the image was so great, that it even made the cover of Life magazine that year. It also graced the cover of many a Goldfinger LP, a unique collection of which are shared below. Revisit Pussy Galore, Sean Connery’s cheeky smile, and other Goldfinger favorites in record form after the jump. … Read More

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What Record Stores Looked Like in the 1960s

Just think: kids being born today will probably never see the inside of a record store. And why would they? Buying music used to involve wandering around a store browsing, picking things up based on cover art, putting them down based on scornful glares from record store employees, and generally being outside your house. Now, buying music usually amounts to nothing more than a click of the mouse from the safety of your couch. So we were filled with nostalgia and warm feelings when we saw this series of vintage photographs of British record store HMV in the 1960s over at Vice. The rows of records! The milling consumers! The record players! That was the life. Click through to see how much things have changed, and then head over to Voices of East Anglia to see even more photographs from the series. … Read More

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