Willem Dafoe

We Will All Howl: Antony Hegarty on the State of Transfeminism

“They announced two weeks ago that in the last 40 years, the number of wild animals has dropped by one-half, and we’re expecting a 50 to 70 percent extinction event of all species by the end of the century,” Antony Hegarty says. “I always think about those stories about the last bird, or the last of a species, when they’re calling out and they don’t have the other animal, the partner that can call back to them. The idea of the disappearing voice is very resonant for me. What hears a solitary voice. What responds to a solitary voice.” … Read More

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12 Must-See Movies at This Year’s New York Film Festival

Tonight, the New York Film Festival kicks off its 52nd (!) edition with the world premiere of David Fincher’s highly anticipated adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl. We’ll have more on that film (and that premiere) in this space tomorrow, but in the meantime, we’ve had the chance to check out several other NYFF selections that are well worth your time over the next two weeks (should you happen to be in the area), or in the months to come as they make their way to your theaters and on-demand platforms. … Read More

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Abel Ferrara’s ‘Pasolini’ Doesn’t Solve the Mystery of Its Subject’s Death — But It Doesn’t Have To

Art’s best and darkest provocateurs have a certain unexpected vulnerability about them. It comes, I think, from their honesty about the human condition — from the risk inherent in standing up and saying, “Yes, I do think it’s as bad as all that,” even if the statement is hidden in poetry or fantasy or metaphor. Even if it means commercial suicide. There’s an earnestness to doing this, and a subtle indictment of the billions of us laboring under illusions (or trying to forget the reality) of how things are. Smarm is a kind of armor; even snark is a way of using humor to defuse horror. Boundary-busting artists from Jean Genet to Lars von Trier to Catherine Breillat to, most recently, Emma Sulkowicz don’t hide behind either. In their bleakness, they lay themselves bare. … Read More

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Staff Picks: Flavorwire’s Favorite Cultural Things This Week

Need a great book to read, album to listen to, or TV show to get hooked on? The Flavorwire team is here to help: in this weekly feature, our editorial staffers recommend the cultural object or experience they’ve enjoyed most in the past seven days. Click through for our picks, and tell us what you’ve been loving in the comments. … Read More

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‘The Grand Budapest Hotel': This Is What a Wes Anderson Action Movie Looks Like

There is often an element of storytelling in Wes Anderson’s films — The Royal Tenenbaums and Fantastic Mr. Fox are both framed by the novels (one fictional, one real) they’re adapted from, and Suzie’s books in Moonrise Kingdom are like characters themselves. But the act of telling a story has never been as much the focus of his work as it is in his new picture, The Grand Budapest… Read More

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The 10 Unsexiest Movies About Sex

Lovelace, the disappointingly thin Linda Lovelace biopic from usually reliable directors Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman, is out on DVD and Blu-ray this week, where it will presumably find its intended audience: people who want to see Amanda Seyfried naked. But that’s about all that’s memorable in the limp picture, yet another case of a movie ostensibly about sex that turns out to be anything but sexy. No, seriously, it’s an epidemic. Here’s a few examples: … Read More

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Remarkable ’80s-Era Photos of Iconic NYC Artists

Jeannette Montgomery Barron’s new photo book SCENE is a must-have for aficionados of the ‘80s New York art scene — for which Barron was something of an unofficial “yearbook photographer,” capturing images of legends like Cindy Sherman, Kenny Scharf, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Jenny Holzer, Francesco Clemente, David Salle, Robert Mapplethorpe, Eric Fischl, and Keith Haring during their starving-artist days. The book launches with an event tonight at BookMarc; the tie-in exhibit, NYC c. 1985, opens tomorrow at Chelsea’s ClampArt. But if you’re not in Gotham, Flavorwire’s got you covered — we were lucky enough to get our hands on several gorgeous images from SCENE. … Read More

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Flavorpill’s Guide to Movies You Need to Stream This Week

Welcome to Flavorpill’s streaming movie guide, in which we help you sift through the scores of movies streaming on Netflix, Hulu, and other services to find the best of the recently available, freshly relevant, or soon to expire. Last time, we walked you though a mass exodus of titles at the end of July, but as Netflix taketh away, it giveth; a ton of new (and catalog) titles were added at the beginning of August, so we’ll walk you though the best of those, and a few other films worth seeking out as well. Check them all out after the jump, and follow the title links to watch them right now. … Read More

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Flavorwire’s Guide to Indie Flicks to See in May

It’s May 1st, and the summer blockbuster season begins with explosions and superheroes galore this Friday as The Avengers hits theaters. And though we’re looking forward to that and a few other big summer movies, it’s easy — particularly in this season — to overlook the smaller and more challenging movies that are rolling into your local multiplexes and arthouses. Thus, we’re kicking off a new monthly feature here at Flavorwire, where we’ll take a look at some of the exciting indies of the month to a come, and a few smaller titles from previous weeks that you might’ve missed. Check them out after the jump! … Read More

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