Yoko Ono

Screaming Artworks That Use the Human Howl as Their Focus

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We’re not sure how Edvard Munch would feel about his tortured Expressionist painting The Scream being used to sell tote bags, umbrellas, and greeting cards. But the Norwegian painter might get a kick out of knowing that his famous creation was stolen twice — and was luckily recaptured. The painting of an agonized figure set against a hellish landscape — which Munch technically titled Der Schrei der Natur (The Scream of Nature) — has been parodied and imitated so much, the mere expression (à la Home Alone) is instantly recognizable. Nobody depicts a blood-curdling howl quite like Munch, but other artists have used the scream as a focus of their work in fascinating ways.
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Yoko Ono Collaborates Again On New Album ‘Yes I’m A Witch Too’

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Today has been quite the day for album release news: apart from the unexpected tidings of a new Dr Dre album, there’s also news that Yoko Ono is releasing a follow-up to her 2007 collaborative album Yes, I’m a Witch. The new album — to be released in January 2016 —is entitled Yes, I’m a Witch Too (get it?), and features collaborations with tUnE-yArDs, Death Cab For Cutie, Portugal The Man, Miike Snow and many others.
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Underground and Alternative Magazines from the ’70s and ’80s That Capture NYC’s Downtown Art World

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If you wanted to find out the real deal behind the fashion, culture, nightlife, music, art, and film happening in New York City during the 1970s, ‘80s, and ‘90s, there was only one place to turn. Alternative and indie publications of the time like Paper Mag, New York Rocker, and Art-Rite captured the diverse intersection of art and life — and the covers of these magazines were just as exciting as the contents within.
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Yoko Ono Is For Everyone

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In October 2000, right around what would have been John Lennon’s 60th birthday, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame opened one of its most extensive exhibits ever, in honor of Lennon’s life and (mostly non-Beatles) work. Amidst the expected artifacts — handwritten lyrics, grammar-school report cards, the white baby grand from the “Imagine” video — sat one that was horrifying: a bag from New York’s St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital containing the clothes Lennon was wearing on the night Mark David Chapman shot him outside the Dakota. Coupled with Lennon’s glasses, caked in 20-year-old blood, this corner of the exhibit was intended as an emotional climax. Even at 13 years old, the weight of these artifacts impressed upon me a jaded anger: How could someone have violently ripped Lennon from this world when all he wanted was to make it a peaceful place?
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