Yoko Ono

Studio Charlie Le Mindu // London // April 2009 //
photo by Holger Talinski, from "What Else Is In the Teaches of Peaches"

Five Years Chronicling the Teaches of Peaches: Photos From Her New Book

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“Sucking on my titties like you wanted me/ Calling me, all the time like Blondie/ Check out my Chrissie be-Hynde/ It’s fine, all of the time.” These were the first words many heard from Peaches, on her 2000 single “Fuck the Pain Away.” Fifteen years later, it seems like a relatively tame opening statement from the transgressive cult provocateur born Merrill… Read More

Cut Piece (1964) performed by Yoko Ono in New Works of Yoko Ono, Carnegie Recital Hall, New York, March 21, 1965.
Photograph by Minoru Niizuma.
© Minoru Niizuma. Courtesy Lenono Photo Archive, New York

Yoko Ono Is For Everyone

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In October 2000, right around what would have been John Lennon’s 60th birthday, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame opened one of its most extensive exhibits ever, in honor of Lennon’s life and (mostly non-Beatles) work. Amidst the expected artifacts — handwritten lyrics, grammar-school report cards, the white baby grand from the “Imagine” video — sat one that was horrifying: a bag from New York’s St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital containing the clothes Lennon was wearing on the night Mark David Chapman shot him outside the Dakota. Coupled with Lennon’s glasses, caked in 20-year-old blood, this corner of the exhibit was intended as an emotional climax. Even at 13 years old, the weight of these artifacts impressed upon me a jaded anger: How could someone have violently ripped Lennon from this world when all he wanted was to make it a peaceful place?
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live-through-this-3313

Courtney Love in the Continuum of Yoko Ono and Marina Abramović: An Excerpt From Anwen Crawford’s 33 1/3 on Hole’s ‘Live Through This’

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It’s no surprise that among Flavorwire staffers, Hole’s masterpiece Live Through This remains an all-time favorite. Back in April, when the album turned 20, we tapped some of our favorite musicians and music writers to dissect the album track by track. Reading Australian music critic Anwen Crawford’s new 33 1/3 chapbook on Live Through This, however, I got a sense that there are endless words for art as complicated as this.
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lee miller

Longform You Have to Read: Lives of the Muses

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In a world where you have more options for satisfying longform reading than ever, your friends here at Flavorwire are taking the time once a week to highlight some of the best that journalism and longform has to offer. Whether they’re unified by topic, publication, writer, being classic pieces of work, or just by a general feeling, these articles all have one thing in common: they’re essential reading. This week, we’re looking at the tangled lines of inspiration and sex in the stories behind some of art’s greatest muses.
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Geoff Dyer

The Best Things We Read on the Internet This Week: The Lake Waco Murders, Geoff Dyer on LA

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Listicles, tweets, your ex’s Facebook status, picture of dogs wearing costumes — the internet offers no shortage of entertaining stuff to look at. But there’s plenty of substantial writing out there, too, the pieces you spend a few minutes reading and a long time thinking about after you’ve closed the tab. In this weekly feature, Flavorwire shares the best of that category. This week, Yoko Ono, Geoff Dyer in Los Angeles, the Lake Waco murders, and more.
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Yayoi Kusama

10 Creative Women Over 80 You Should Know

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She’s a Broadway legend and an Emmy-winning television actress (playing Jack Donaghy’s mama on 30 Rock) — and now Elaine Stritch is the subject of a vérité-style documentary, which looks back on her colorful career. The brassy 89-year-old actress (then 87) contemplates mortality, retirement, and her domination of the stage and screen in Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me. The Chiemi Karasawa documentary raises familiar questions about career longevity and the innate compulsion to create — all of which are surely on the minds of these incredibly creative women who are also octogenarians (and a few nonagenarians). They seem unstoppable, despite what their ages would have you believe.
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