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Kevin Roose’s ‘Young Money’ Is About Wall Street’s Misery, Not Its Debauchery

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It’s not exactly news that a lot of people who work in the finance industry are horrible, terrible, no-good people. In fact, at this point it’s practically an article of faith. In that context, it’s hard to say why a piece by Kevin Roose at New York magazine feels so shocking. He reports on the goings-on at Kappa Beta Phi, a sort of financial fraternity for people too damn old to be in a fraternity. Roose crashed their party, a sort of “roast” whose object seemed to be “politicians, the poor, and basically anyone who’s not actually in the room,” which makes it not at all a roast actually, but no matter. Hijinks ensue!
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Great News! ‘The Wolf of Wall Street’ Creators Don’t Know What It All Means, Either

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Debate continues to rage over whether The Wolf of Wall Street is an sales pitch for the behavior it depicts or a searing indictment of Wall Street’s excesses. Movie critics and, well, others, are getting kind of defensive about this one! Possibly because no one wants to be seen as apologizing for terrible behavior, and also possibly because there is a level on which a debate about how a film “feels” about its characters becomes incredibly stupid. Because, and it’s sad this needs to be said, films don’t actually have any “feelings.”
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‘The Wolf of Wall Street’ Is a Film About Selling, and Most Salesmen Are Liars

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A few years ago, during my ill-fated stint as a corporate litigator, I found myself in a conference room waiting for a meeting with some bankers to start. It was all men but me, a not-uncommon occurrence in those days. And one started joking to another about some people they knew in common. They’d been out to a basketball game for some client event and one guy, these men gossiped to each other, had brought a sex worker along. Mind you, they didn’t call her a “sex worker” per se. Instead, giggling like schoolchildren, they referred to her as a “lady of the evening.” Listening, I had my face set in an expression I developed for situations like that one, meaning situations in which businessmen were showing off for each other and I was meant to tolerate it without comment. I would just let my mouth set into a natural frown, and appear very interested in my notepad. I once came back from some such meeting and found I’d written “oh christ oh christ oh christ” perhaps a hundred times over.
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Why Did “Wolf of Wall Street” Get a Pass From the MPAA, When Feminist Films Don’t? A Conversation With Jill Soloway

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For the next few weeks we’ll all be talking about Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street, because it’s a big movie, and an awards contender, and, as our own film editor says, pretty damn good. I have not seen the film yet, but per Deadline Hollywood yesterday, it displays the usual Scorsese love of the expletive and even a little more sex than we’ve come to expect from him:
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Scorsese’s ‘Wolf of Wall Street’: Merciless Satire About Serious Business

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“This right here is the land of opportunity,” Jordan Belfort tells his fellow stockbrokers, in the midst of one of his high-energy company meetings on the sales floor, about midway through Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street. “Stratton-Oakmont is America.” That’s the name of their firm, introduced in the dignified television commercial that opens the movie, in which a gravitas-dripping narrator explains the company’s responsibility and respectability. Scorsese then hard-cuts to a dwarf-tossing competition on the sales floor. The message is clear: this is America, and these are the greedy, drug-fueled children who just about drove it into the fucking ground.
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Scorsese’s New Movie is Too Long, According to People Who Haven’t Seen It (or His Other Movies, Apparently)

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A couple of days back, Paramount released a new trailer and made a pair of announcements about Martin Scorsese’s new film, The Wolf of Wall Street. First, as rumored, it is not going to make its original mid-November release date; instead, it has been pushed back to Christmas Day, bumping the studio’s previously-earmarked Christmas release, Kenneth Branagh’s Jack Ryan reboot, into 2014. And since one of the supposed reasons for that push-back was the time Scorsese had spent wrestling with a rough cut clocking in anywhere from three to four hours, they went ahead and announced the picture’s running time: 165 minutes, or two and three-quarter hours.
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