'Project Runway: Threads' and the Unexpected Joy of Children's Reality Competitions

There isn’t much that you need to know about Lifetime’s newest unscripted program, Project Runway: Threads,... Read More
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Age Ain’t Nothin’ But a Number: Links You Need To See

It’s October 22, 2014. We carry the future in our

Speaking of Taylor Swift. There’s a lot to that girl, y’know? More than you would think, or want to think. But there is a lot — enough to have inspired an entire incomplete glossary. (Mere hours after its publication, it’s already out-of-date in that it… Read More

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Staff Picks: Flavorwire’s Favorite Cultural Things This Week

Need a great book to read, album to listen to, or TV show to get hooked on? The Flavorwire team is here to help: in this weekly feature, our editorial staffers recommend the cultural object or experience they’ve enjoyed most in the past seven days. Click through for our picks, and tell us what you’ve been loving in the comments. … Read More

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Some Other Joan Didion Kickstarter Rewards We’d Like to See

It’s a great day for people who admire and revere the work of Joan Didion, our leading writer regarding the elegiac decay of the modern age. Her nephew, Griffin Dunne, who you may know as an actor (After Hours) and director (including Practical Magic, the best ’90s witch movie), is working on a Didion-approved documentary, We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live, about the writer, and today they announced a Kickstarter campaign, along with a trailer. … Read More

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’90s Pop-Culture Witches, Ranked

Every generation gets the witches that they deserve, but the ’90s was a very special time for the witch (teen and otherwise) in pop culture. It was a time when even seamy little b-movies aimed at teens had a bunch of women talking to each other and accessing an ancient source of power. It was pretty cool! Now that the wheels of nostalgia have turned so that the ’90s is fair game, we’re separating the wheat from the chaff in your misty, rose-colored memories of pop culture witches. … Read More

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The Death of DIY Williamsburg Is Not Your Fault

The Internet: the place where there’s never an opinion too stupid to publish. You could drive yourself insane worrying about every dumb thing that gets said online, but still, occasionally something so arse-clenchingly asinine comes along that it’s nigh on impossible to keep quiet about it. So, here goes: Brooklyn music venue Glasslands announced this week that it’s closing at the end of the year. This, along with the imminent demise of Death by Audio and the fact that 285 Kent is already long gone, means that from 2015 onwards, there will officially be absolutely no reason to go to Williamsburg again. This is sad, certainly — it marks the end of an era, although honestly, the writing has been on the wall for this particular era for at least a decade. … Read More

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How to Taylor Swiftify Your Personal Brand in 12 Steps

Next week, Taylor Swift will release 1989, her fifth album and her “first documented pop album.” Swift announced the album back in August, but she’s been setting up her grown-ass reintroduction to the public for some time now. To the outside eye, Swift has made some major changes in her life: a move to New York, new famous pals, love life on hiatus, and above all, no more country twang. She’s done it in a brilliant way, with distinct strategies that could be useful to a number of different creators. Let’s go through the 12 steps of Swiftian reinvention as it relates to one’s personal brand. … Read More

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Examining the Post-‘Will & Grace’ Careers of the Show’s Four Stars

From 1998 to 2006, Will & Grace was one of the most popular sitcoms on television and its four stars — Eric McCormack, Debra Messing, Megan Mullally, and Sean Hayes — were inescapable. They were an infectious cast of actors who worked best when together; Will & Grace was not always the strongest sitcom but it was made infinitely better by the chemistry between the leads and the comedic talent they all shared. These four actors catapulted to stardom early in the series’ eight season run and each won Emmy Awards for their roles (Mullally received two), so greatness wasn’t just expected — it was practically guaranteed. But now? Hayes recently started a run on the lifeless CBS sitcom The Millers, Messing is slumming it on a weekly basis with the aggressively terrible The Mysteries of Laura, and McCormack and Mullally have been all over the place during the last few years — was Will & Grace the peak for them? … Read More

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Move Over, James Franco: Tom Hanks Pens So-So Fiction for ‘New Yorker’

Move over James Franco and Steve Martin: you aren’t the only fiction-penning celebrities around. This week, The New Yorker features a short story by Tom Hanks — yes, that Tom Hanks — which seems to be heavily influenced by his time working on Apollo 13. While reading, I had do my very best to approach the story, a futuristic space-jaunt called “Alan Bean Plus Four”, as a lighthearted foray into fiction by a revered actor (director, screenwriter, producer, and cultural figure) and not as something I would mercilessly savage if I were in a fiction workshop and a “packet” of my peers’ writing had just arrived in my arms for a pre-class critique. … Read More

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The White House’s First Website Looked Like It Was Made in the 90’s (and It Was) : Links You Need to See

Today has been a difficult day on the Internet, with people dissecting Renee Zellweger’s face (LOL except NOT), Adobe apparently pulling its ads from Gawker under pressure from #GamerGate, and this tragic mansplain-y piece about mansplaining. But there’s hope, still, for content that keeps its head above water. Onward, my friends, or backward, perhaps: today marks the 20th anniversary of the White House’s website launch. Elahi Izadi has an illuminating examination of that fateful day, and—good lord—how far we’ve come. Although, I guess if you had to sign up for health care on the Affordable Care Act website…maybe not. … Read More

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History Begins Here: Luca Chiriani

Presented by Cole Haan

When we worked with Cole Haan to present our Inspiration Workshop at Wallplay last month, one of the many incredible discoveries we made was NYC artist Luca Chiriani, who helped us articulate the empowering theme “History Begins Here” through his original artwork. Other amazing elements of the weekend-long event series: Classes from General Assembly master teachers; panel discussions featuring creative thought-leaders and innovators; and a pop-up library from The Sketchbook Project. Check out the following video to see what inspires Chiriani, and keeps him motivated throughout his creative process. … Read More

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