10 Fascinating Films Set in a Single Location

Sisters are reunited at a secluded estate in the woods in Mona Fastvold’s brooding, restrained study of family dysfunction in The Sleepwalker. “The unplanned sibling visit turns into a socially awkward weekend getaway. There’s table banter and after-dinner dancing (to instrumental Yo La Tengo) in the vast, lamp-lit parlor,” writes Jordan Hoffman for The Guardian. “These scenes glide along, evolving into near surrealism once our characters turn in for the night and succumb to the titular somnambulism.” Relying on emotional performances, the remote house serves as the movie’s primary location — a striking manifestation of the sisters’ “self-contained universe” — where the dark family history unravels. We look at other films that find their inspiration from single locations, reflecting the interior world of their characters. … Read More

  • 0

The Wolfen Book Covers of Jack London

“He was sounding the deeps of his nature, and of the parts of his nature that were deeper than he, going back into the womb of Time,” wrote Jack London in his 1903 classic novel The Call of the Wild. The story centers on a dog named Buck who is sold off and shipped to the Klondike to be trained as a sled dog. The harsh conditions and treatment ignite his primitive, wolflike ways — and he becomes the story’s mythical hero. London’s 1906 novel White Fang finds a wolfdog on the journey to domesticity. The author’s experiences as a “hobo,” sailor, and journalist took him to faraway places — many which become the settings for his stories. “It was in the Klondike I found myself,” he wrote while reflecting on his days in the Yukon Territory. London always had a penchant for dogs and animals, and his cold-weather travels found him surrounded by them. The wolves and dogs of London’s stories made their way to the covers of his books, which we’ve collected in memory of the author. … Read More

  • 0

Strange and Sexy Footwear Inspired by Vintage Sci-Fi Films

From Jane Fonda’s sexy space traveler in Barbarella to the Capitol couture featured in The Hunger Games, science fiction cinema has influenced fashion for decades. Eindhoven-based designer Mandy Roos, who we discovered on Moco Loco, has taken inspiration from old-school sci-fi films “and their imaginary visions of future, spaceships and unknown universes.” She uses futuristic materials like rubber, plastic, foam, and slime to style her wildly impractical, humorous, visionary footwear. The collection, Invasion Of The Foot Carrier, even sounds like a lost camp classic from the annals of 1960’s sci-fi. Take a closer look in our gallery. … Read More

  • 0

Will Grindr Work in the World’s First Underwater City? : Links You Need to See

Oh, the questions a day of staring at the Internet stirs. While on the one hand it may be selfish to burden you with these questions, on the other, I’ve never been one for censorship. Anything can, possibly, be meaningful to someone, so who am I to withhold (subjectively) thought-provoking information about, say, Zac Efron masturbating from the general public? As Deleuze said, “Si vous êtes pris dans le rêve de [M. Efron], vous êtez foutus.” So clearly it meant something to him. … Read More

  • 0

The 6 Best New Songs We Heard This Week: Mark Ronson With Bruno Mars, Mary J. Blige With Disclosure

This week brings strong dance cuts from Mary J. Blige’s Disclosure collaboration and Giorgio Moroder’s first new studio album in decades, plus rising rookie Tobias Jesso Jr., Tink, 1D, and Mark Ronson with Bruno Mars.

… Read More

  • 0

This Week’s Top 5 TV Moments: ‘How to Get Away With Murder’ Reveals Its Murderer

There are scores of TV shows out there, with dozens of new episodes each week, not to mention everything you can find on Hulu Plus, Netflix streaming, and HBO Go. How’s a viewer to keep up? To help you sort through all that television has to offer, Flavorwire is compiling the five best moments on TV each week. This time: How to Get Away with Murder shows its title murder (spoiler ahead) — but hasn’t explained how to get away with it. Yet. … Read More

  • 0

The 50 Best Independent Fiction and Poetry Books of 2014

2014 will go down as a landmark year in independent literature, chiefly because a few longstanding “trends” or “developments” are hardening into verifiable traits of fiction and poetry beyond Big Publishing. Independent poetry, in the works of such writers as Claudia Rankine and Andrew Durbin, is becoming more sophisticated in the way it encroaches upon other forms of visual and literary art. In fiction, a greater tendency toward autofictional novels of emotional maturation — typically in a cruel world — is colliding with the arriving generation’s faith in the bending of genres. The increasing confidence these writers have in their forms is beginning to show in the way they assert themselves against an older generation, sure, but it’s also showing up in the quality of the books. Plainly put: line for line, stanza for stanza, independent writing, and therefore independent publishing, is better than it was just a few years… Read More

  • 0

‘Happy Valley’ Points a Camera at How Colleges and Communities Deal With Abuse

Amir Bar-Lev’s documentary Happy Valley opens up at a Penn State football game. In glorious, colorful, slow-motion shots, we see the joy that comes out of football: the fans with faces painted white and blue, the cheerleaders’ perfect yells, the teeming wave of people coming together for this particular moment. There is a community that forms around football here in State College, Pennsylvania, the “Happy Valley” where Penn State’s campus is located. It is nearly perfect. There is a mural featuring some of the community’s heroes, like the Penn State football coaches. It is ripe for a fall. … Read More

  • 0

Why Is California Prosecuting a Rapper for Making an Album?

There’s really no witty or amusing way to start this piece, so I’ll get directly to the point: right now, in 2014, in America, a man is facing life in prison because he made a rap album. As per the LA Times, Brandon Duncan of San Diego, who performs under the name Tiny Doo, is allegedly a member of a gang that has been implicated in nine shootings, for which 14 members are about to stand trial. Duncan isn’t charged with participating in the shootings; instead, he’s being charged under a California state law that prohibits “willfully promot[ing], further[ing], or assist[ing] in any felonious criminal conduct by members of [a] gang.” The evidence against him? His latest album, along with “pictures on a social media page of him and several other defendants.” This is… well, there’s really no other way to say it: this is bullshit. … Read More

  • 0

Searching for Clues — and Closure — in Ian Curtis’ and Kurt Cobain’s Handwritten Archives

Ian Curtis wrote in all caps, often with a Sharpie. When he wanted to change a word in his lyrics or notes, he’d scratch out his former word choice utterly completely — as if he wanted to erase it from existence. In a lot of ways, the Joy Division leader’s handwriting seems to reflect his personality: “Ian was a very definite person,” says Jon Savage, the co-editor of So This Is Permanence, a collection of Curtis’ notebooks released last month by Chronicle Books. “If he didn’t like something, he would eventually make his displeasure shown. He was a Cancer.” … Read More

  • 0
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 8,471 other followers