From Tom Hardy to Cate Blanchett: 5 Celebrities' Perfect Responses to Sexist Interviews

Why do reporters ask vapid gendered questions about diets and clothes and “balancing work and family” of... Read More
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Supreme Leader Snoke and Supreme Painter Tennessee Williams: Links You Need to See

It’s imperative to begin this links roundup with some some photos of breathtaking bookstores, because this is the internet, on which people write about things that aren’t at all imperative — like looking at photos of breathtaking bookstores — as if they were. Apart from providing listicle opportunities, bookstores (which happen to be “hanging in there” despite the changing technologies behind the act of reading) also contain books, which contain information, likely spanning the history of the entire world. What they might not contain, however, is the otherworldly news of the just-revealed, very very silly name of Andy Serkis’ character in Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Said very very silly name in question is: Supreme Leader Snoke… Read More

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Richard Prince’s Instagram Project Isn’t Just Morally Questionable — It’s Boring Art

At this point, there remains very little to say about an artist who has been as roundly, comprehensively, and rightly criticized as Richard Prince has over the years. Even so, there’s something particularly egregious about the art world’s most notorious magpie’s new project, which, as widely reported, consists of printed screenshots of people’s Instagram photos. The fact that Prince has been selling these images for $90,000 apiece probably says more about the gullible nature of fine art collectors than anything else, but it does add insult to injury for anyone who happens to be the subject of one of the pictures that have been lifted. … Read More

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Are Literary Awards Biased Against Books About Women?

The VIDA count has exposed persistent gender disparities in prestigious literary publications’ bylines — but what happens once books are published, sent into the world, and made ready for critical consumption and evaluation? Does a bias remain? Novelist Nicola Griffith set out to answer to this question by looking at the genders of both author and subject in the Pulitzer Prize, the Man Booker Prize, the National Book Award, the National Book Critics’ Circle Award, the Hugo Award (for science fiction and fantasy) and the Newbery Medal (for children’s literature) in the past decade and a half. And what she discovered goes even deeper than a byline… Read More

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Flavorwire Premiere: Watch the Acid Western Book Trailer for Colin Winnette’s ‘Haints Stay’

Now that its arrival is only a matter of days away (June 2nd), it’s safe to say that Colin Winnette’s Haints Stay — a deconstructed Western praised by Sam Lipsyte, Saeed Jones, and Lindsay Hunter, among many others, and published by the unimpeachable Two Dollar Radio — is the most anticipated independent novel of the summer. And, frankly, it may be the most anticipated American independent novel since Sarah Gerard’s Binary Star (which we told you about several times and praised on its way to widespread acclaim). Certainly we’ve been thinking about Winnette’s book since January, when I called it “a work by an assured writer who is on the verge of something important” — Haints Stay proves he’s no longer on the verge.
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The Inevitable Disappointment of “This Summer’s ‘Gone Girl'”

For as long as there have been reviews and blurbs and publicists, the phrase “This summer’s [insert name of last year’s bestseller]” has been beguiling — and assaulting — readers from the catalogs and roundups that roll out around this time each year. In the aughts, for instance, wave after wave of empowered, transformative female characters set the standard against which other novels were marketed. In 2004 and 2005, any frothy, sartorial saga that hinted at the indignities of working as an underling was “This summer’s The Devil Wears Prada.” In 2006 and 2007, tales of ass-kicking punkettes on the fringes of society were inevitably “This summer’s Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.” In 2008 and 2009, any woebegone memoir of triumph-through-travel was “This summer’s Eat, Pray, Love.” In 2009 and 2010, any injustices in small-town America were “This summer’s The Help.” And since then, every novel that hints at an unreliable narrator, that presupposes that marriage is not all hand-holding and dream-sharing, that lets a lady go off the rails and takes us along for the ride, is, of course, “This summer’s Gone… Read More

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David Duchovny Can’t Save NBC’s ‘Aquarius’ From Its Charles Manson Confusion

Aquarius should, for many viewers, be the series to watch this summer. It’s a dark-ish 1960s crime drama full of hippies and dope, it loosely shoves Charles Manson at the center of it all, and it stars the always-great David Duchovny as the main detective who stumbles across Manson (Gethin Anthony) and co., making for a surely engaging cat-and-mouse game that brings together fiction and reality. Yet it doesn’t seem to achieve the highs that you’d hope for, at least not in the first two episodes that premiere tonight; still, the full 13-episode series will be available online on May 29, because NBC is taking an odd bet on the fact that people will want to binge-watch it. … Read More

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Theater of Cruelty: The Strange American Reception of Nell Zink’s ‘Mislaid’

Nell Zink’s second novel, Mislaid, announces her as one of a handful of the best novelists on the American scene. More satirical, willfully magisterial, and, yes, even earnest than The Wallcreeper — a debut that was far more earnest than even its admirers admit — Mislaid draws its immense humor and literary ingenuity from the postwar American South, that weird, melodramatic dispositif of class, race, and gender lines that strains to confine our lives even today. By the end of Mislaid, the satire dissolves into parody, or vice versa, leaving a cast of characters — of human animals in a habitat — who have rearranged their limitations, in a way that may offend many readers, in order to pursue better, shared lives. … Read More

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HBO’s ‘Nightingale': David Oyelowo Dazzles in an Astonishing One-Man Performance

All things considered, it’s pretty silly to get worked up over the snubs and slights of the Oscars — it’s an awards ceremony that just plain gets things wrong, and always has. But it still rankled most sensible viewers to see Eddie Redmayne’s awards-courting turn in the decidedly mediocre Theory of Everything take Best Actor when David Oyelowo couldn’t even land a nomination for his masterful performance in Selma. It doesn’t ultimately matter, of course; that’s not only a performance that will last, but one of many from the actor. And here’s another: in the HBO original movie Nightingale (premiering tomorrow night) he performs something of an actor’s decathlon, inhabiting the picture’s only onscreen speaking role for 82 minutes. It’s an astonishing piece of work. … Read More

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Taylor Swift Is Not Your Mom, But She May Be Your “Aunt Becky”: Links You Need to See

If you’ve been jonesing for worldwide fame and recognition, right now is your chance: Game of Thrones is looking to cast some unknowns for season six. If you fit the bill of “Priestess,” “Pirate,” or “one of the greatest soldiers in Westeros,” drop out of medical school or whatever else you’re doing this instant and go to the casting call. Or, you can just forever keep being an Ordinary Person (OP), only remembered in old family photos or in unflattering, hyperreal sculptures by Duane Hanson like these other OPs. Look, when you’re famous (like Lena Dunham), you can post photos of yourself in your lingerie on Instagram and get almost 100,000 likes. Just like that. So what are you waiting for? … Read More

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Staff Picks: ‘Guilty By Suspicion,’ ‘Lunch With a Bigot’ and ‘Unheard Songs by Karen Dalton’

Need a great book to read, album to listen to, or TV show to get hooked on? The Flavorwire team is here to help: in this weekly feature, our editorial staffers recommend the cultural object or experience they’ve enjoyed most in the past seven days. Click through for our picks, and tell us what you’ve been loving in the comments. … Read More

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