Don’t Count on Tomorrow Being the End of Crazy ‘Serial’ Theories: Links You Need to See

The disappearance and probable murder of 43 university students in the Mexican state of Guerrero has sparked outrage and protests across the country. The official story is that the mayor of Iguala, Guerrero, and his wife ordered the disappearance of the students, who were kidnapped by municipal police and handed over to the local crime organization Guerrero Unidos. However, Vice News, coupled with Mexican print magazine Proceso, report that there’s a lot more to the story than President Enrique Nieto’s government is claiming. Vice‘s investigation of the incident in Iguala has been thorough and excellent all the way through. Priscilla Mosquedo‘s addition to the series is no exception. … Read More

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Longform You Have to Read: 2014, Year of the Feminist

In a world where you have more options for satisfying your longform reading needs than ever, your friends here at Flavorwire are taking the time once a week to highlight some of the best that journalism has to offer. Whether they’re unified by topic, publication, writer, their status as classics, or just by a general feeling, these articles all have one thing in common: they’re essential reading. This week, we take a look back at one of 2014’s most complicated words: feminism. … Read More

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Staff Picks: Flavorwire’s Favorite Cultural Things This Week

Need a great book to read, album to listen to, or TV show to get hooked on? The Flavorwire team is here to help: in this weekly feature, our editorial staffers recommend the cultural object or experience they’ve enjoyed most in the past seven days. Click through for our picks, and tell us what you’ve been loving in the comments. … Read More

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‘MasterChef Junior’ Lost Some Magic — But Remained Adorable — in Season 2

Last night, MasterChef Junior aired the finale of its too-short, seven-episode second season. MasterChef Junior is the most joyous reality show currently on television, a weekly treat in which viewers get to watch tiny and adorable wunderkind chefs create extravagant dishes worthy of a five-star restaurant. The first season was nothing less than spectacular, a surprising entry into the cooking competition genre that won over everyone who watched it — even those who aren’t big fans of cooking shows (or children). Season 2 started off strong, but seemed to lose a bit of its magic along the way. … Read More

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Flavorwire Interview: Amy Sedaris on ‘Broad City,’ Tinder, and Her New Movie ‘Goodbye to All That’

In the new comedy Goodbye to All That — which, thankfully, is not based on the classic Joan Didion essay — the charming, handsome Paul Schnieder (All the Real Girls, Parks and Recreation) plays a hapless recent divorcé diving into the brave new world of contemporary dating, from Facebook to women looking for hookups. It’s the directorial debut of Angus MacLachlan (who also wrote the screenplay), who may be best known as the writer of 2005’s Junebug, one of the best films of that decade, and the one that introduced Amy Adams to the world. … Read More

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Farewell “Stephen Colbert,” Feminist Ally and Preserver of Sanity

This week we say goodbye to “Stephen Colbert,” the persona who has, with unending, high-octane bluster and faux ignorance, regaled us from the bully pulpit of his nightly show.

I will miss him terribly, though, the truth is,  I haven’t watched The Colbert Report regularly in several years — I usually tune in when a friend tells me to watch a specific segment. I don’t seek catharsis about the day’s news just before bed these days; rather, I want to forget the day with sitcom reruns, my DVR queue, or a good novel (for that reason, I have also given up any regular viewing of the MSNBC nightly lineup or The Daily Show). In some ways, Twitter’s endless quip competition around the day’s doings has replaced that sort of ritual for me. But that further demonstrates that Colbert’s humor shaped the way we think about news and social justice. … Read More

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Google vs. Merriam-Webster: 2014 Was a Weird Year for Search Terms

Almighty Google, index of indexes, inventory of human life, infinitely linked panlexicon of terms, has released “A Year in Search,” its booleanized breakdown of World Thought. “In 2014,” Google says, “we searched trillions of times. What do these searches say about us?” Who is us? Maybe the Google “user” is the updated version of the mass consumer? … Read More

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10 Great 2014 Movies You Can Stream (or Rent) Right Now

Well, moviegoers, the year is drawing to an end, and ‘tis the season for “best of 2014” lists. Ours will arrive later this week — and as with most, thanks to the Oscar-courting release patterns that have become the norm, it’ll be full of films you’ll either have to go to theaters to see, or that aren’t even at your neighborhood theater just yet. There’s nothing we can do about that, but in the meantime (as a kind of appetizer), we thought we’d offer up a few great movies that didn’t quite make the final cut, but have the advantage of immediate availability for streaming or rental. Add them to your queue for the holidays, or just click the title link to watch right now. … Read More

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Poison, Pubes and Pubs: Links You Need To See

Poison–readily available in traditional domestic settings and requiring little brute force to use effectively–has long been considered a woman’s weapon. While most poisonings are committed by men–only 39.5 percent are committed by the fairer sex–if a woman kills, she’s most likely to have used poison as her method. At The Hairpin, Meredith Haggerty wrote a piece detailing some of history’s most famous–and horrifying–female poisoners, including Lucrezia Borgia (who was said to possess a ring filled with poison that she’d use at parties), pictured above. … Read More

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‘The Real World: Skeletons’ Is MTV’s Latest Attempt to Reinvigorate a Tired Franchise

How do you even review The Real World? The reality show has been on for 30 seasons now, and no two are alike. Most are objectively awful. Yet this can rarely be blamed on the show’s premise — The Real World has, for the most part, stuck with its original “seven strangers picked to live in a house” format. Whether or not the format works is actually the result of the particular characteristics of each group of seven strangers. Are they “real” people who are legitimately open to new experiences, or are they empty caricatures of the reality show roles they are molding themselves to fit into? Are they genuinely interested in meeting new people, or are they just down to fight and fuck in order to become “famous” on MTV’s blog or in a GIF recap? The cast is usually the main draw of The Real World, but lately the show has resorted to more desperate measures, like last season’s “EX-Plosion” or this season’s “Skeletons.” Whether these conceits “work” is tricker to figure out. … Read More

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